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Lately, I have really been interested in getting a cat. Unfortunately, there have been some issues which mainly lie with my parents.

My father grew up with many dogs as a child, so he really doesnt have an issue with getting a pet, other than the pet living inside the house.

As for my mother, she is really against the idea. I've told her many times that cats are relatively clean creatures but, she insits that cats have awful odors, will leave fur all over the place, and scratch the furniture.

One option would be to get an outdoor cat, but that's not something that I would really be interested in. I want an indoor cat.

My mother suggested that I have an outdoor cat, but not in the sense that you are probably thinking. She wants me to feed some random wild cat and "train" it to live in the shed. I tried explaining to her that this would never work, and it's simply not a possibility.

Does anyone have any advice on convincing stubborn parents on getting an indoor cat, that one perhaps recalls from their childhood?

Thanks in advance! :D
 

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Your mom's theory about them being smelly and dirty I would say solely depends upon the owner. I have two cats in a one bedroom apartment and you wouldn't even be able to tell if they weren't in plain view. My friends always comment on that fact. If the owner scoops the litterbox daily, and brushes the cat regularly to minimize shedding, your main problems are solved.

When you pick out a cat, get one that you think would fit your home the best. Some shelters will let you be alone with a cat in a room for a while so you can guage it's personality. Stinkiness can happen if your cat has litterbox problems -- but litterbox problems are almost always because of one of two things: an internal problem like a UTI, or behavior problems due to stress in a new situation, separation anxiety, etc. All can be fixed with work, and are not present in all cats by any means. Some shelters also socialize the cats themselves, know if they have litterbox problems, so they could tell you what the cat is like. I'd suggest one that is mellow and doesn't seem startled or scared by noises and changes in environment -- that's usually your best bet for a cat that will not have litterbox issues.

As for keeping it outdoors -- BAD idea. And living in your shed would just be cruel. Outdoor cats live for an average of 3-5 years, and indoor cats often live to be 15-20 on average. It's because outdoor cats are exposed to so many things on a daily basis. Such as:

1. Other animals who could injure, eat, or transfer a disease to your pet.
2. Poisonous plants, car fluids, etc. that your cat would be attracted to.
3. Fleas, ticks, worms, ear mites.
4. Traffic. Don't disregard traffic even if you live in a rural area -- all it takes is one car.
5. People who catch cats and sell them for scientific research. This does happen very often -- the average price they bring is 80 dollars.
6. Strangers. Would you let your kids run around all day alone? Some people think it's fun to torture animals, and they are all around. Or neighbors who are angry because your pet doesn't know it's not supposed to poop in their yard.
7. Unhealthy things that your cat might eat during the day without your supervision.

All these are realities. Plus the simple fact that cats kept outdoors are more of a danger to YOU because you have no idea what they have contracted or brought home with them. When cats live indoors, you KNOW where they've been, therefore you know how clean and safe they are. So if your mother is worrying about smell -- tell her that an indoor kitty is the solution to that. Cats clean themselves, don't have an "odor" about them unless they've been outside and exposed to all sorts of things, and don't *like* being messy by nature. They will use their litterbox if you provide it, and if there is nothing else wrong with them.
 

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Unfortunately this arguement held no sway. It can be characterized as more of the type of argument where, "You can't get a pet because I said so" type of deal. She has said many times that she is just not a "pet person."

I would also like to clarify, with no offense to outdoor cats, that I have no intention of keeping an outdoor cat. None. I understand where you are coming from, but I also have no intention of being "cruel" to a pet, if it so happens that I get one. If I seem at all offensive, then I apologize.

To other regards, do you have any other suggestions other than simply trying to enforce the idea of what a perfect pet a cat would be into their minds?
 

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Drag them down to a shelter and when your mum sees the cats faces she wont be able to resist....... or would she be that stubborn?

although saying that she may have a fear or something. Im 21 and i didnt find out until a month or 2 back that the reason my aunty never wanted a cat is that she is actually terrified of them.... but she never said anything until i invited her down here and she had to tell the truth, your mum may well be afraid to say so.
 

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I hope this post doesn't make me wildly unpopular.

Agrae: at this point, please don't get a cat. Here's why:

I got Sabby when I was 11 years old. My dad didn't want me to have a cat at all. The reason I got him was because my neighbors shot and killed my cat, Whiskers. Whiskers was a farm cat we brought with us from the city from our house in the country. He was strictly an outdoor cat. My dad wouldn't allow him to be indoors. When I first got Sabby, he also wasn't allowed to be indoors and my parents insisted I keep him in the garage. However, Sabby got his voice from his Siamese mother and it really pierces the air when he gets going. The only way to keep him calm was to keep him indoors. So we had an indoor cat and my dad always resented it. If your parents are anything like mine, then they'll hold that cat over your head constantly and you will live in constant fear of them getting rid of him. Worse, when you go to college or leave home to do whatever it is you'll do with your adult life, you'll need to bring your cat along with you. It won't have a home with your parents. Keeping Sabby was the single most difficult thing I have ever done. Finding an apartment that I could afford and that would allow me to keep him was near impossible. Now I have a senior, diabetic cat on my hands and I can barely afford the vet bills.

I love my cat. But he's a lot of trouble and my life would have been a lot easier if I hadn't had him.

Cats are wonderful pets and I highly encourage people to get one, but only if the situation is right.

Please don't hate me.
 

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Agrae said:
I would also like to clarify, with no offense to outdoor cats, that I have no intention of keeping an outdoor cat. None. I understand where you are coming from, but I also have no intention of being "cruel" to a pet, if it so happens that I get one.
That's the impression that I got from you -- which is why my entire post was basically info that you could give to your mom to show her how having an outdoor cat would not be good.

To other regards, do you have any other suggestions other than simply trying to enforce the idea of what a perfect pet a cat would be into their minds?
I am not sure what else you are asking for -- I thought that's just what you were asking for. Your mom said she didn't want one b/c they were stinky and dirty, so I explained why they are not. You said your dad and mom wanted to keep a cat in the house, so I gave you reasons why keeping an outdoor cat is bad. I'm not sure what other ideas you are looking for, I'm sorry. If your parents cannot be convinced, then I think Annissa is right.
 

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After I was age 10, we had no more cats--not because my parents didn't love them, but because they had indoor-outdoor cats (as most people did at that time. There was less traffic, and I didn't know anyone with an indoors only cat.). but because my mother loved them too much to have them disappear, get attacked, killed, and break her heart. Oh, how I wish this forum had been available then. I can remember four different cats, one at a time, from the time I was four until I was ten. (My mother and father had taken in every cat that came crying for food.) Then there were no more until I got married.

As soon as I got married I got two cats-immediately, and have had two or more cats ever since. I have also had a collie--and for a long time-three collies, and there has never been a problem.

There was no use asking again. Once my mother said, "No more heartache," I knew there was no use asking again. It was a long wait, but the home belonged to them. My mother and father enjoyed my cats the rest of their lives. I wish I could give you a better answer, but all people have to respect the wishes of the people who own the home. Someday that will be you. :)
 
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