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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

As you might've read from my initial post we are the owners of a 3 year old female, spayed, totally indoor cat.

We stay on a second floor flat (with a balcony) that is approx. 970 sq. feet. Emmie's sandbox is on the balcony (outside, but away from wind and weather) and she has the run of the house and accesses the balcony through an open window.

We would LOVE to have another cat to share our house with, but not being that familiar with cat-husbandry we have some questions that I hope you can help us with, as we would want what is best for the animals and not only what we would like:

1. Is the space of the flat sufficient for keeping another cat?
2. Would it be better to get a male or female cat as the new addition?
3. Is there issues with territoriality between "old" cats and "new"?

That should do for a start - thanks for taking the time to answer.
 

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Your place is bigger than mine, and I had four cats at one time! :grin:

Here's a great article on cat introductions

Cat-to-Cat Introductions | Little Big Cat

The sex of the new cat doesn't matter as much as the personality. Younger cats seem to be accepted more readily, maybe 6-8 months old? Kittens are accepted almost immediately, and they're adorable, but gosh, they're hard work.

The only thing I'm wondering about is the balcony. Sometimes cats get distracted and start chasing a fly or a moth and run right off things (like my cat running off the end of the bed).
 

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I agree, your flat should be large enough. But the balcony is a worry. When I was around 11 years old we had a cat who would sit on the top of the stairs and fall asleep, roll over and fall down. >_<
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi all,

Thanks for your answers (and concerns). The balcony is completely cat-proofed with plastic mesh-wire enclosing the railings and hanging flower boxes filled with cacti from the railing to dissuade her going over the railing. We have not had a single escape attempt as she learned quite early that the funny looking plants packs a punch! :)
 

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I agree, your place sounds big enough to house a pair of cats as long as they get along. I would worry on the balcony myself, and would see about enclosing it if possible(If it isn't already.), cats chasing each other tend leap before they look a lot. We have had members here who have had cats fall several stories before.

If you really want to expand on space, build up.. stair stepping shelves up a wall are a nice addition for cats that like to be high.

Kittens are usually the easiest to introduce. But if the personalities are compatible older cats can be brought in. If both are altered, sex of the cats shouldn't be to big a deal.
 

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I had 2 cats...we had the one before the other. We had a lot of aclimation to do before things were cool between the two. Often when bringing any new animal into anothers relm there has to be periods of getting use to each other. Dont fret if they fight some, this is normal. But, you must always talk to your current cat letting them know things are ok.

Space is not as important as having areas for them. As our cats became friends they were always where the other one was. Granted the younger one would bug the older one at times, they played, and kept each other company when we were out.

I've had both males and females and didnt see any differance. My cousin runs an animal Inn and has 16 cats on their farm. Most are drop offs that they kept and after a short time they learn where the food is and where to sleep.

As far as territory goes, thats hard to say. If you old cat is use to running all over everything and is marking a lot with her feet and cheaks you may want to do a little washing before the new cat comes in. Just be ready to get between if things go hostile...after all they are cats.
 

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I'm in a similar situation at the moment :) The article linked by marie73 is very useful, am currently going through the separation stage between my cats.

The only problem is that the old one is too lazy to scope out the new unless he is right under his nose!
 

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Your best bet is to find your second cat thru a foster home situation. Foster parents know a cats likes and dislikes to help you match up the right companion with your kitty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi everyone',

We got the most beautiful, friendliest rescue kitten this morning! She is so cute and REALLY playful. We've set aside a room for her with food, water, sandbox, toys etc but as soon as we close the door she starts with crazy,incessant meowwing that stops (and turns into a lovely spin) as soon as we reenter the room. Should we just ignore the meowwing or are we doing something wrong?

Also,she has this lick-fetish and never seems to stop licking our hands.

Sorry if these are stupid questions that we are supposed to know,but our current cat didn't behave like this at all as a little kitten
 

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There is no such thing as stupid questions. Cats have feelings and emotions. It may have been taken from the companionship of brothers and sisters. From the nurture of its mother. Im not sure of its age or background but Im sure its feeling abandoned and scared and lonely. Classic behavior from a kitten dropped into a foreign living area. Ideally a kitten should be 12 weeks old when adopted out from its family. Congrats on your new kitten!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi Mitts,

Thanks for your reply. Anything specific we should be doing? We are taking turns spending "alone time" with each cat so the "existing" one doesn't get jealous of both of us being in the closed off room with the "new" one, while the " new" one is still getting attention and getting used to both of us.

Tomorrow we both have to go back to work though, so then I'm afraid they'll have to sort themselves out through the door
 

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Hope the cats are beginning to get along!

I have a question (along similar lines as this thread)- my cat finally took notice that the kitten is stuck in a room, and hissed/growled at the door. Is this normal, or should I be worried about the hissing even when the kitten is not in sight.

Also in regards to the kitten, he doesn't like being stuck in the room and mews a lot, do I just harden up or is there is something I should be doing? All his stuff is in there, and it is a bathorrom joined to a bedroom so there's plenty of space.

I really dont want the kitten to turn neurotic, so all help/suggestions are much appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Also in regards to the kitten, he doesn't like being stuck in the room and mews a lot, do I just harden up or is there is something I should be doing? All his stuff is in there, and it is a bathorrom joined to a bedroom so there's plenty of space.
Hi Ella,

Not really getting along, no. They have at least eaten some treats from different sides of a glass door withing freaking out. I have to confess, we couldnt take the poor little one's meowwing any more (and also Emmie sat outside any way, even with the door to the room closed) so we let the baby out. She is roaming all over, and Emmie is still sitting outside, so at least no negative change.

We will still sleep in the separate rooms each with our own cat, and keep the rooms separate when going to work tomorrow, but we will now let them both roam as they want and just keep a very close eye.

Thank you for your interest and good luck with yours!
 
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