Cat Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I love this breed. I posted in the breeding section I had 3 breeds in mind but after more thinking last night I wouldn't mind adding a Ragdoll in the future. Since I would have dogs and possibly other cats I would need a breed that could blend in really well. It will be awhile before I get another cat(I have ten animals right now and that is PLENTY) but I really like to know my options before going and getting another cat. I LOVE my cats I have now but I would like to get a pure-bred cat next from a reputable breeder. If anyone has experience with them and can tell me how they do with there other pets I would appreciate it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
I seem to remember you saying that you let your cats outside. Ragdolls are one breed that are not okay outdoors. Their relaxed, trusting attitude gets them in trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
I seem to remember you saying that you let your cats outside. Ragdolls are one breed that are not okay outdoors. Their relaxed, trusting attitude gets them in trouble.
I don't know any breeders, of any breed that allow owners to let the kitten/cat outside (excluding enclosures or harness)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,676 Posts
<<<<<-------- Seal Bicolor Raggie to your left

You can't always count on all the breed characteristics.

Fay is sweet, cudley. laid back, long haired but doesn't shed much or need brushing, likes dogs and would love to kill the new cat I brought in 2 months ago. Poor guy can't get near me and he's never safe on the floor. Raggies are big and she has some serious claws that she's raked him with hard quite a few times.

Maybe it'll change in the future, maybe not. The new guy has been here for 2 momths and was seperated and given a very careful intro. I also thought Fay was going to rip Mia to shreds for the first 2 months but after 2.5 years their best buds.

You can't count on an easy intro.

Also, Fay is a girl. My Vet warned me they don't take well to new cats in their territory. The new guy, a 15 Lb male Raggamuffin, doesn't want trouble and is getting to be buds with the tiny Colorpoint . A male might be a better choice
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,450 Posts
You can see the pics of my cats in my signature. Muffs is a purebred Ragdoll and Abby is a Ragdoll/Persian mix (doll-faced Persian). I can't speak for all Ragdolls, just my two.

Muffs is NOT a lap cat and she hates to be held or handled, although she enjoys being petted. She's very independent and likes to do her own thing. She's also very shy and timid around people. On the plus side, she is extremely well behaved. She never scratches anything other than her scratching posts, sits quietly in the morning and waits for me to get up, rarely jumps on my counters and is basically a little angel. She's also very quiet and rarely meows. She sheds a fair bit and requires daily brushing.

Abby is a little cuddlebug and loves to sit on my lap. She follows me around from room to room. She's also shy with new people and she's reasonably well behaved...a bit of a monkey at times, but never destructive. She's not as quiet as Muffs, but not overly talkative either. She also sheds a fair bit although her coat is pretty easy to care for.

I agree with the posters who warn that Ragdolls should be indoor cats. They wouldn't know how to defend themselves against other animals. I had a mouse inside the house once. The cats were sniffing it at first, but when the little mouse moved, both cats ran under the bed terrified of the mouse! :razz:

I also agree with Dave about not taking well to new cats. I had a long, difficult introduction period with my two at first, although they get along well now. I would not add another cat to the mix at this point, since I know neither of my girls would be happy if I were to do so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thank you! I know all cats are different but I needed some different reviews on them :) If I got the cat as a kitten and it grew up with the cat already in the home then would it be easier to have them get along? Also if I go to a breeder to get a ragdoll what should I be looking for? I know with dogs it is health clearances and if they do some kind of venue with them(like showing,field trials ect..) is it the same with cats?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
823 Posts
Ragdolls are a marvelous breed. We've had Truman for over a year now and couldn't be more infatuated with his character and attitudes.

It sounds like you have a busy household, so being able to control the ins and outs would be important as others have mentioned, they aren't an outside-access cat. We have a husky, and they mesh together wonderfully, but to Kaya's credit, she's a docile, patient, gentle heart and their bonding was probably more because of her temperament, than Truman's (the raggie).

Just know that while Ragdolls are known for their "ragdoll-ish-ness", that does not necessarily mean they are docile, cuddle-seeking felines. They are as unique as every other cat and/or cat breed as to whether they will seek out your lap or not. Characteristically, you can depend more likely on them seeking your company, and by that I mean they will greet you at the door and follow you around the house as you navigate your daily routines.

As far as a "reputable breeder", you should look for someone who genuinely cares about the home they are placing their kitten in. Someone who cares enough to spay or neuter the kitten before placing in a pet home. Someone who insists on adequate growth and socializing time with the momma before allowing you to take the kitten home. The breeder should be concientious about DNA testing. In my opinion, they should screen you as much as you intend to screen them.

I'm glad you are taking the time to investigate your options. Best of luck.

~Mrs. GhostTown
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Also if I go to a breeder to get a ragdoll what should I be looking for? I know with dogs it is health clearances and if they do some kind of venue with them(like showing,field trials ect..) is it the same with cats?
Make sure they are registered, I prefer breeders that show their cats too. You want someone who does all the necessary genetic testing too, Ragdolls this includes HCM and MPSM.

Look at what you're getting for the price, cheap kittens are cheap for a reason. Good breeders send their kittens off fully vetted - vaccinated twice, microchipped, neutered and with a health guarantee.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Make sure they are registered, I prefer breeders that show their cats too. You want someone who does all the necessary genetic testing too, Ragdolls this includes HCM and MPSM.

Look at what you're getting for the price, cheap kittens are cheap for a reason. Good breeders send their kittens off fully vetted - vaccinated twice, microchipped, neutered and with a health guarantee.

What would be the normal? A few breeders I was looking at ranged from $700-$900.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
823 Posts
That is a consistent going price. Pet quality, altered kittens usually start at 700, and show quality altered around 900. I agree with Spotty about a breeder who shows their cats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,676 Posts
You can get a retired breeder for less, possibly even $0.00 on a rehome once the evil breeders are done forcing thier little kitty sex slaves to bare kittens for them.

Also, check Petfinder in your area. Even people who serve Ragdolls eventually pass away or have to give up their cats leaving a homeless little floppy cat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
710 Posts
We have two Ragdolls.

Evie is a blue mitted Ragdoll. She is super loving, very cuddly and loves being picked up. Contrary to popular beliefs, Evie is a super vocal Raggie! She NEVER stops talking, she trills, meows, shouts... even in her sleep! She is the naughiest cat I've ever known and a stealth at stealing food (we're talking pinching the bacon from a bacon sandwich without anyone noticing. Opening cupboards and gobbling down boxes of treats.).

Mitzi is a blue linx mitted Ragdoll. She can also be rather vocal, she especially likes shouting. She likes to be picked up on her terms and will let you know if she doesn't like it. She is cuddly, affectionate and the loveliest cat... But on her terms! She likes climbing on top of wardrobes, can open doors and likes to remove lids from boxes.

I wouldn't swap the girls for the world- they are the loveliest cats, but they don't come without their problems. Being Pedigree they are naturally more prone to conditions and illness. Evie is allergic to a whole host of food- chicken, grains, rabbit... We had six months of diarrhoea trying to work her problem out. She is also prone to stressing out easily, although this has decreased since she has become content in her home and trusting in us. Evie was originally purchased by her previous owner as a Breeding Queen at great expense (£750-800), but was never bred from due to the breeders personal circumstances. So, although she has been very carefully bred (her Pedigree declares she's from Champion lines), she is still a 'complicated' cat.

Be careful where you get your cat from (both of mine we got from people rehoming them at 18 months and 2 years old), but go for it- you'll never regret the decision of welcoming a Ragdoll into your life.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,851 Posts
I'm slightly obsessed with Ragdolls despite never knowing one in person. They sound really great, I'm more for mellow with less talking. It's likely if I ever got a purebred cat, it would be a Ragdoll. I'd go for one of those illusive seal mink ones, which is the coat color... which is sort of ridiculous when you think that it also is two different animals...

From look at ~10 different breeders in BC, the lowest I could find was 500, the rest of the sites were 600-700+ for pet quality and between 900-1200 for show quality.

I noticed most breeders charged more for the mink color (starting at say 800), which sort of puts me off. I've read on various sites that color shouldn't be a factor in pricing, yet almost every breeder I could locate charges more for them. When I checked how to breed a mink colored kitten it doesn't look that complicated.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top