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Discussion Starter #1
Saw her yawn three times, confirmed the cavity was not stuck food.
(I can't open her mouth myself, she's too strong!)
It's the last lower molar on the left. Meaning: it's on the mandible which is SUPER delicate and vets don't like pulling teeth from there (unless they have to) because things can break and nerves can be damaged.

I already give her dental treats and I know you can't reverse the cavity.

She's still eating so it's not painful yet.

What do vets do in these circumstances? If we wait, it could just get worse, and then, hello abscess.

MY QUESTION:
Do vets drill cavities? Fill with a resin? I don't want to have the tooth pulled if it can be avoided.

I also don't have much money. But I will give her the care she needs. Either way I'm not happy about having her go under anesthesia again :(

:eek:nekitty
 

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Cleo had six teeth pulled on her last visit, two of which were dangerously close to the jaw bone. They said she has a tooth resorption condition. Your vet can take xrays (or send you to have them done elsewhere if they don't have that particular machine) to see the situation better ($900 here just for those xrays!!) or they can be very, very careful when pulling the tooth, which is what my vet did. You can't fill a tooth with that condition, it has to be pulled, which I think would be cheaper than a filling anyway.

Tooth Resorption in cats

Feline tooth resorption is a common and painful condition in domestic cats. Studies have shown well over 50% of adult cats develop tooth resorption. The teeth become functionally destroyed as a result of tooth (dental) resorption. These lesions were originally called feline "neck lesions", "cervical line lesions" and cat "cavities" because the lesions were typically observed in the "neck" region of the tooth or cervical area (in the region of the sulcus). This is very close to the area where the tooth meets the gum line or the free gingival margin. Initially, it appears that the gingival tissue is growing into the tooth or is covering over the base of the tooth as shown in the photo below. In some cases, there appears to be a "hole in the tooth" (also shown in below photos). Some teeth undergoing tooth resorption are not clinically apparent until dental radiographs are taken
 

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i've never known of a vet that filled cavities. (there may be but i've never seen one.) if there is a cavity and it isn't painful yet, pulling it is probably the best option, and the sooner the better. if it's too expensive now, it will be way too expensive later and she might even be sick from it on top of that.

just do whatever has to be done as soon as possible.
 

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Yeah, just have it removed and have a dental done at the same time. Be sure to do bloodwork beforehand, and to be extra safe, make sure she is put on antibiotics a few days beforehand (which will continue until a week or so afterward) and have them run fluids during the procedure.
 

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Cleo had six teeth pulled on her last visit, two of which were dangerously close to the jaw bone. They said she has a tooth resorption condition. Your vet can take xrays (or send you to have them done elsewhere if they don't have that particular machine) to see the situation better ($900 here just for those xrays!!) or they can be very, very careful when pulling the tooth, which is what my vet did. You can't fill a tooth with that condition, it has to be pulled, which I think would be cheaper than a filling anyway.

Oh, Marie, I'm right there with you! Mimi has had 9 teeth pulled (6 due to resorption). Her last dental was in December 2011 and I can already tell she goes back in September for another since I've noticed her rubbing her face alot more lately which could be the start of more resorption. And I feel your pain on the xray cost! I have to take Mimi to the veterinary dentist since my vet doesn't have a dental xray machine - and they are almost 2x the cost of the regular vet for dentals. I will say, though, that I have 100% confidence in them - I've resigned myself to the fact that her dental issues alone will run me at between $1800-$3600 a year. And I wouldn't change the decision I made to adopt her for one minute! She's been with me a year and I feel like she's been with me my entire life!

Tutubean - PLEASE get your kitty a dental checkup as soon as possible. I saw a huge difference in Mimi once we took care of her tooth pain. Good luck and keep us posted!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok guys, thanks, I'll have make an appt with the vet soonish (be back in town mid-Aug). the cavity was in the enamel only (light brown) and not yet advanced (black). with proper dental care in humans, cavities can take years to advance. wondering if I should look into dental care.... but really, she practically goes "lockjaw" on me when I try to look at her teeth.
 
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