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Hi all, I want to get some advises on the documents i read in the http://littlebigcat.com web site. I want to know what is best feeding format of dry or can or combination is good for my cats. They are 9 yrs old, 12 yrs and 14 yrs old.
I am thinking about switching to the can and dry foods to dry food only. However, after i read the documents, I found that can foods is more healthy than dry food??? I thought most of the Vet told me dry food is much better because of all the nutrition and good for teeth? I am totally confusing now. Also, one of the documents mentioned, "Stay away of "light", "senior", "special formula" food? I thought they should be lighter than the original formula food? Also, the doucment mentioned "Cats who are overweight, diabetic..should not eat any dry or semi-moist food"? Isn't it can food has more fat than dry food?
Again, after reading the documents, I am totally confused. Can anyone help me to choose a right feeding format for my cats? My cats are all overweight, and hopefully they don't have diabetes or bladder/kidney disease. However, some of them need to clean the teeth, but it is still in good shape.
Thanks a lot.
 

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Hi Tyan,

I have an overweight, diabetic cat. I learned from Dr. Jean that feeding him canned food only is best for him. Dry foods are loaded with carbohydrates which are turned to sugar in the blood stream. Since Sabby doesn't produce insulin, he has far too much sugar in his blood stream and it makes him prone to bladder infections and other nasty things. Canned foods also usually contain carbohydrates, but usually have far fewer than dry food. I currently feed Sabastion Wellness canned food. He likes the beef and chicken flavor. It has very few carbs and very good ingredients. Have you heard of the Atkins diet? It works very much like that. As a matter of fact, when I started going over the list of foods allowed in the South Beach Diet, it was like they were listing the ingredients in Sabby's food!

If I knew then what I know now, I would have fed Sabby Wellness cannned food from the beginning. It would have saved me loads of money on vet bills, insulin, and syringes.

As far as dental hygiene is concerned, they sell feline toothbrushes and pastes to clean your cats' teeth. I recommend doing that too. Sabby has bad teeth even though he ate dry food most of his life. He had one horrible absessed tooth that cost me $80 to have removed!
 

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I don't think you will get any one sound answer from multiple places. And that's just something you will have to face, and then go with what works best for your cat.

Yes, canned food is better nutritionally then dry food when we are dealing with high quality ingredients. It also puts more moisture in a cats diet.

Dry food however, is not as likely to cause kidney problems as some people think/say now adays. With more and more high quality foods coming out on the market, and the stressing of good daily water intake.

Personally, I like to feed mostly highy quality dry food. I feel it does keep their teeth/gums "cleaner". But this doesn't mean that it's ok to skip out on daily teeth cleaning and dentals when needed.
I also give a high quality wet food or wet food suppliment every 2-3 days. I feel it would even be fine to give a portion of wet food up to once every day. But that it is benificial for your cat to eat something hard and crunch after eating the wet food.

But there is some debates with the wet food being bad or good for teeth. There has been research showing both. So I go from personal experiance. That being, cats fed mostly wet food have very stinky breath, and bad teeth/gums.
 

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I believe Dr. Jean said that wet food has the same effect as the Atkins diet. It's high in protein and low in carbohydrates. She prefers wet food.
She also recommended that we study the subject and choose a good food, using that knowledge, watching to see what ingredient is listed first, what kinds of grain are used, etc. These specs have been discussed and argued over and over.

I feed dry and wet because my vet suggested a combination. This might not be suitable for your cat, however.

If your cat has a medical condition which requires a special diet, whether it's for weight loss or necessary because of disease, please discuss it with your vet.
 

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Educate yourself on the subject, don't take statements like: "Stay away of "light", "senior", "special formula" food?" too serious, some of these special products might be less good but it is your cats needs that counts.

I found out (after educating myself on the subject) that the standard adult food contains sometimes as much as three times the amount of nutrition than what the cat really needs so I studied the nutrition value and the ingredients of a light product and it contained just as much of everything that my cats needs (actuarally what most cats need).

There's nothing that's definately right or wrong on this subject. I mainly feed my cats dry food but they also get some wet food from time to time.

Cats that tend to drink to little might feel better eating wet food, and cats with different disorders (such as diabetes) might need a special formula or a mix of different kind of food.

But if you do choose to feed your cats wet food, don't forget to have a close look at the teeth. Give them something to "bite at" from time to time.
 

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I feed my cats wet food in the morning and free feed dry all day. They seem to be doing great and I feel like they are getting a very good nutritional intake. Sometimes once every few days I feed them wet food at night too. The dry food is good since they crunch on it and wet food is good too for the moisture and nutritional intake. It really depends on your cat and what their needs are. :D

I used to think I was just giving them treats with the canned food, and it kinda is but I do it everyday now b/c of its healthy contents and b/c they love it and need it. :wink:
 

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canned or dry

Well, since it was my article that confused the issue, let me try and simplify it.

Canned food is higher in fat and protein than dry food. However it is much lower in carbohydrate. Cats' metabolism is designed to use fat and protein very efficiently, and it is the carbohydrates that cause them to become fat. The high moisture content of canned food is also very beneficial. Cats eating canned food consume twice as much water in a day as cats eating dry food who also drink water. This is important for the kidneys and helps prevent crystals and stones from forming because the urine is too dilute.

The original poster said his cats are all overweight. For these, I would recommend only canned food. As mentioned, this is like the "Atkins diet." Cats who are already overweight are, almost by definition, intolerant of carbohydrates. Therefore, carbohydrates in their diet should be strictly minimized. You cannot do that with dry food because it is mostly carbs, so canned food is the only solution if you want to use commercial food. Homemade is, of course, another option, and then you can design it with whatever proportions you want.

I recommend for all cats to stay away from soft-moist (Tender Vittles) because they are mostly carbs and preserved with sugar on top of it.

Light foods tend to be lower in fat and protein, and thus *higher in carbohydrates* than normal foods, so in reality they are a very poor choice for weight loss in cats. Same with senior foods, they are similar to light foods with less fat and protein. "Special Diet" foods are pretty much worthless according to the experts and can harm your cat. So that's why I say to avoid all these.

Let me say categorically that dry food does not clean the teeth. If it did, we would all be flossing with Triscuits. The original studies found that dry food produces *slightly less* tartar than canned, but certainly not zero or negative tartar. I have seen plenty of hideous, diseased mouths in cats that never ate anything but kibble. The *only* way to keep a cat's mouth in good shape is by daily brushing and routine cleaning by the vet.

Most vets receive 90-100% of their nutrition education from the pet food companies themselves. For example, in my 4 years of vet school, I had a grand total of 2 hours on small animal nutrition, and even this was taught by a guy from Hill's Science Diet. Therefore, vets are, unfortunately, not an accurate source of information. I have been studying pet nutrition for more than 10 years. So, I can honestly tell you to believe me because *I'm RIGHT!* (Well, at least I *think* I am, LOL!)

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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Just want to cast my vote for canned food. It more closely resembles a cat's natural diet than dry food does. Let me start by saying I don't have statistics to back this up :? but any vet I'd trust with my cats suggests canned is better than dry in most cases, for the reasons Dr. Jean mentioned, already.
 
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