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Monkey will be 7 years old this June and therefore considered a senior in my eyes.

She has always been fed a raw meat diet and has had limited vaccines.

She is an indoor cat but is allowed outside once spring/summer comes on her leash and harness (with me holding the other end).

I am considering adding some suppliments to her diet but not exactly sure what to give on top of her fish oil and raw.

Just wondering what some of the other senior cat parents do to keep their babies healthy and happy?
 

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Bentley is our sr. cat - we got him in 2004 from a guy that had him 5 years. He was already an adult cat when he got him. Estimated age is 14-17 years old. Is starting to show his age. Joints ache on rainy days and he gets cranky.
Methos is 13 - still very active.
Pixel is 12
We feed a UTI dry food available 24/7. Everybody gets wet food 1/2 can in am & pm
Pixel has eating issues so he gets smaller portions of the Blue Buffalo canned but gets fed 3 times a day. Plus these 3 older guys get treats of Beechnut baby food in pureed turkey. Or they do if I stand guard since the younger guys all really really like their nomnom treats.
I do find it harder to keep weight on these 3.
 

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One of my cats is 10+ (indoor/outdoor) and the other is 15 (indoor only)... they both appear to be doing well. I don't have anything special I do with them, they both get fed wet food with dry supplement. I'd say to just keep doing what you're doing. Some cats can live to be in their twenties, many have an average of at least 15 years, so seven isn't even half their life.
 

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Tammy is ten, she'll be 11 in May. We don't give her any additional supplements- she's on a wet only diet as she can have stomach problems, but she just has her usual 2-3 pouches a day, plus any meats she fancies (she has picky tastes but when she wants something she'll sit on the kitchen breakfast bar and meow sweetly until Mum gives in!).

My boyfriend's Mum's cat lived until 18 on a wet/dry diet and she had no additional supplements.

So I agree- although 7 may be considered an 'older cat', I really don't think they are.
 

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I am always amazed to hear these high numbers. growing up I never had a cat live past 6. I worry daily for my Silver who will be 6 in June. Yet he has gotten healthier and more kitten like the longer we have him as an only cat occassionally rehabbing street kittens my husband brings home after finding them dumped in his work parking lot. Silver has helped us house train and place 2 street kitties since we brought him home from a family member's home who deals with cat hoarding issues. That family member does not believe in spay and neutere, luckily we had gotten Silver neutered at 6 months of age and another of their cats spayed at 1 year of age. Still working on the rest.
 

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Paizly is 10.
She gets good quality dry kibble left out all day, and 2 oz of canned food in the morning with a little extra water (she has UTI issues).
I give her a dose of SynFlex in the morning (before canned food, so canned is sort of a treat for being good and taking her meds!). It has 2 kinds of glucosamine, to help with her arthritis and bladder issues.
Other than that, I really don't do anything special. Except for the SynFlex, Nebbie (3 yrs) gets the same stuff too.

Because Paizly has no back legs, I do have little pet stairs at the couch and the bed, so she can come up and snuggle. When she was younger, she used to just reach up and dig her claws into the cushion/mattress and haul herself up...but since she uses her shoulders so much for getting around, they're starting to get too achey to lift all 10 pounds of herself. So the stairs are used now to make it easier. (and yes, I got holes in one couch cushion and a side of my mattress from claws... but I love my kitty more than my furniture!)
 

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7 is barely middle-aged for most cats, though I applaud your attention to the aging process. It would be a good idea to have a full blood chemistry and CBC run on your cat now to serve as a baseline for later blood tests when your cat really does become aged. After the age of 10, annual blood tests will help keep an eye on your cat's health and identify any emerging health issues early.

I supplement all of my raw-fed cats with fish oil and taurine. For the elderly cats (over 15 yrs) with serum potassium levels below 4.0, or those of any age diagnosed with renal insufficiency, I also supplement potassium and B vits.

Laurie
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks everyone.

I guess I will keep doing what I am doing and re-asses in a few years.

Just curious.. when is a cat considered a senior in your eyes?

I know in dogs, especially GSD's, we consider a 6-7 year old a senior and therefore start suppliments.
 
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