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Hi, i have a question to ask about Chincilla. Can you breed a Silver Shaded Chincilla with a Golden Chin ? Is the golden a dilute or dominent gene? Will you get 50 / 50 offspring of gold and silver ? Just curious about them :lol: ? Or can anyone recommend some good reading material.

thanks
aloysius
 

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silver and gold shaded breeding

I was just reading about this subject today in an interesting book called "The proper Care of Silver and Golden Persians" by Dee J. Single. According to the author, the following scenarios are possible. 1. Two silvers that do not carry a recessive golden gene (i.e. two homozygous silvers) cannot produce a golden kitten, only silvers. 2. Two silvers where only one carries a recessive golden and the other does not (i.e. one is homozygous and the other is heterozygous) will produce all silver kittens, with half carrying a golden gene. 3. Two silvers both carrying a golden gene (ie both heterzygous) 25% will be golden, 25% will be honozygous silvers and 50% will be heterzygous silvers. 4. A golden and a heterozygous silver half will be golden, half will be silver. 4 Two goldens, all will be golden. Without predigree, you don't know if your silver is heterzygous or homozygous. It sounds like goldens are harder to come by, and golden chincillas, as opposed to golden shadeds, harder still.
 

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I cant help you, but heres a link to a chinni forum which im sure will know what you need to find out.



I was going to edit this out, but that is against the new rules

yes I realised my stupidity loool
 

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Evidently, silver is preferred right now, so the judges cannot set a standard easily. According to the laws of genetics, if you made a chart, it would come out as mpicard stated. Two silvers with a recessive golden gene could produce a golden. Color can be quite uncertain, unless you know the colors of all the members in the cat's pedigree.

I had a beautiful Mahogany sable Collie dam which I mated with a Mahogany sable sire. She had a mixture of little "blonde" collie pups and tri-colors. Color is quite unpredictable because of recessive genes. Pure for sable requires no recessive tri genes, however, but if there are recessive genes it's a coin toss!

I have dark brown hair and brown eyes and married a blue eyed man. I have two blonde boys with blue eyes and two girls with brown eyes and hair. I had a 50/50 chance of blue eyed children because my sisters had blue eyes. but to have a predictable outcome is impossible unless two pure for golden breed.

Here is the standard as now written, subject to change:
NEW Standard
Undercoat pale honey to bright apricot. Coat on back, flanks, head and tail sufficiently tipped with black to enhance a golden appearance. Legs and end of tail may be shaded with tipping. Chin, ear tufts, chest and stomach, consistent DILUTE color, much lighter in tone than the undercoat color. The general effect is lighter than a shaded golden due to less tipping. Rims of eyes, lips and nose are outlined with black. Nose leather: Rose. Paw Pads: Black. Eye color: Green or blue-green. Disqualify for incorrect eye color, incorrect eye color being copper, yellow, golden, amber or any color other than green or blue-green.


Rationale
The current color standard for the goldens does not cover the broad color spectrum or description that goldens exhibit. This can be very discouraging for both exhibitor and judge, especially since there are so few exhibiting the goldens. Few judges have ever bred or shown a golden; therefore, the written color standard may be their only guideline. With a more detailed description, judges will be more able to recognize a "good" golden when seen in the show ring. The color "cream" is a dilute or red and not a genetically appropriate color description for the goldens. Both exhibitor and judge will benefit from a more useable guideline that more clearly defines the "ideal" which is the objective of a color standard. These proposals are a means of clarifying the current standard.
 
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