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This link was suggested by Heidi:

"Feral Cat Den"
http://www.alleycat.org/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?pid=338

Feral Cat Den (aka Feral Cat Handler) - When you must hold a cat for several days for recovery from an injury or extensive surgery, the den provides a quiet hiding place. The den can be placed in a larger holding pen or large cage where the cat is being held, along with a litter box, food, and water. The cat enters the den by a porthole on the side that you easily slide shut once the cat is inside. You can then take the cat for cleaning, treatment, or transportation. A vertical sliding door makes it easy to transfer the cat to another cage or return the cat to the den for recovery after surgery.
Heidi's comments:



"THIS image shows the flat transfer door for transferring a feral to a carrier and it shows the smaller round door that can be operated from outside the cage with a stick to keep the handler safe when containing the feral cat.

The feral could go into that could be closed/opened with a stick through the bars of the kennel so the feral cat would be safely contained and the area could be cleaned or the cat transported. The FCD can be used in veterinary recovery kennels or larger wire dog-crates."
 

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Totally agree!

Alley Cat Allies have great info, how to, and so many tips on the subject, a visit on their site is a must for answering many questions! They also have a very cool newsletter, you just have to sign up for it!

sandyrivers
 

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I came up with a method of trapping cats in a farm colony that has worked very well using an ordinary cat carrier, the hard plastic kind with a metal grid front door. The carrier has to be a reasonably large one that cats can easily walk into.

I take a strong cotton string, tie it to the top corner of the door, and run the string through the carrier and out one of the holes in the back. Then, I place wet food/bait in the very back of the carrier and stand back as far as necessary--fifteen or twenty feet in the case of more wary cats. When the cat is all the way in and eating, I pull on the string, which pulls the door closed. I keep tension on the string as I come around and latch the door. If I need to catch other cats, I put a cover over the carrier to keep the cat as calm as possible.

The reason I like this method is that it allowed me to be selective. I've had 32 cats spayed/neutered, and the problem is, after the first few, usually the friendliest, you need to capture the ones you haven't caught before. In my experience, even after being caught, some cats will go right back in the trap after the bait, while others remain wary.

The drop-trap, held up by a stick attached to a string, is another way of catching specific cats. I came up with a variation of this using a plastic laundry basket with a square cut-out at one end that I covered with a sliding piece of cardboard (coming out a slit in the bottom of the basket). I would place a carrier near the food tray, come up behind the cat I wanted to catch while it was eating, and drop the basket down over it. While holding the basket down, I'd maneuver the opening in the basket up to the door of the carrier and slide open the cardboard panel. The cat would almost always flee into the carrier, and I'd quickly shut the door.

Part of this approach was just logistical practicality. I could fit three plastic carriers in my car, but only one of the larger Have-A-Heart traps.

As with all these methods, you usually only get one chance on any given day. If you miss, the cat will be spooked and won't come near. It's best to practice beforehand to get the knack of how to spring the trap.
 
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