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Does anyone here have any experience with how to best put flat-faced breeds under anesthetic?

I have an unfolded Scottish Fold and she is not entirely peke-faced, but she uses her accessory muscles to breathe and makes odd noises when breathing after play and when purring. She is only 4 lbs at 9 years old. She has very tiny nasal passages and seems to look like some cat version of a dwarf with other physical abnormalities. We have never had her fixed because the vet thought that being under anesthetic would drastically reduce her ability to breathe properly (since she wouldn't be able to consciously use her accessory muscles to breathe), and that her small size could be a risk for anestheia as well. Now, I know cats with breathing issues get fixed and I would like to soon... (I need to be gainfully employed first since I just lost my job)... so what kind of anesthesia is best for a cat that is a risk to it?

My Burmese cat Godiva is even more flat-faced than this particular cat, and she got through the surgery just fine. However, she does not seem to use accessory muscles to breathe and merely snorts when excited, whereas Sneakers makes horrible noises and you can see her rib cage and abdomen kind of suck in and out with each breath.
 

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I don't know the answer to your question, but I will strongly suggest that if you do decide to put your girl under anesthesia, for spaying or any other anesthetic procedure, that you take her to a university vet school to have it done. Not only will a university vet clinic have access to the widest range of sedative and anesthetic drugs, but even more importantly, they will have the necessary monitoring equipment and veterinary specialists on-hand to keep your girl as safe as possible.

From your description, I'd be VERY reluctant to risk anesthesia with a cat like yours, and I wouldn't do so unless it was medically absolutely necessary.

Laurie
 

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I saw in your other thread that your tiny girl has had a litter already! How scary considering her size especially since they all seemed pretty normal sized from your pics.

As long as she can't accidentally leave the house and all the boys you bring into your home are fixed, I wouldn't risk it.

I bet you'd find a ton of vets to do it because you're "supposed to" spay despite your concerns. You'll also find vets recommending dry food for urinary issues an weight management!

I'm sure it's possible to have her spayed, but I'd have a long interview with any vet that OKs it to ensure they have a plan for any potential issues that may arise due to her unique situation.
 

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I'd really want to talk about this in detail with a vet - quite a number of years again, mine advised against me having an adult tom done because of his asthma and I don't see this situation as a million miles removed.

I'm afraid I'm going to controversial here. This is one of the meany reasons I have doubts aout the factors we are breeding into our cats. I live in dread of some of the dreadful problems that exist in many pedigree dogs (at least uder the auspices of out KC over here), starting to crop up in the same way in cats. If any factor, however appealing, causes problems for the cat, than it shouldn't be a ideal to be aimed at for the show-ring or for any other reason.

Your cat is lucky in having someone who is trying to put her interests first.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My instinct says to not get her spayed, but social pressure causes me to consider it. :) I was so glad she and her kittens turned out fine. Even though one of them was so crammed that he had twisty paws when he came out... they straighted as he grew, however. She had gorgeous kittens... all of them are smaller cats as adults, but not with the petite bone structure that she has and none of them are less than six pounds.

Thanks for your input, folks... I learned my lesson with not neutering a male in time. I would suggest to everyone else that perhaps 4 months is a better time to have the neutering surgery insteaed of six, as recommended by the vet!
 

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I'm not sure... but what about a strong local anesthetic that wouldn't affect her breathing? I'm a complete layman about cat medicine, though, so it's just an idea, perhaps a bad one.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This is how a four pound cat looks pregnant with six kittens...


And that isn't even the largest she got. She could barely walk by the end. She resembled a beach ball and a head and four legs sticking out! I'm so glad she turned out okay... I was very worried but the vet seemed to thinks he could handle it, so I proceeded to let her have them. Not without a little help from some oxytocin and manual manipulation, however...
 

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haha. knowing that she and all the kittens were OK, that picture is actually pretty comical. (although I'm sure she wasn't laughing!)
 

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I know Persian breeders who's kittens are desexed at 10 weeks, just like other pedigree kittens and they don't have any breathing issues. They are well bred though, with large open nasal passages.

Amazing at 9 your girl hasn't had any issues to continually cycling in and out of heat. She may naturally stop cycling, as some seem to at an older age.

Have you got any feline specialist clinics near you? They'd offer more answers to your questions than a regular vet.
 

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I have an unfolded Scottish Fold and she is not entirely peke-faced, but she uses her accessory muscles to breathe and makes odd noises when breathing after play and when purring.
I had two Persians before, both were show/breed quality so their faces are very peke. They don't make "odd noises" even after long playing session. This doesn't sound normal.

Their neutering (at around 2 year old) were just normal procedure. Bloodwork before surgery + fluid during surgery. I don't remember the vet did anything special for them.
 

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Just a comment here - if your unfolded Scottish Fold is part British Shorthair (very likely) I would also recommend caution with anesthesia, not necessarily because of her nasal structure but because of her parentage. Brits are known to be sensitive and have trouble with anesthesia, and to require more monitoring to be on the safe side. Our Gracie also had a bad reaction to her rabies vaccination, and has had to have a "no shots" note put into her medical records. I think you are wise to be careful with your sweet little girl.

Fran
 
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