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Discussion Starter #1
Obviously I am not going to breed either of my two mutt cats, but I want to know the pros/cons of spay/neuter surgery in cats. As more and more research comes out on the dangers of early sterilization in dogs I have begun to think about Tucker's upcoming neuter. I don't want him to spray or breed Kyra, but I want to know what the consequences of my choices will be. Kyra is nearly two, and I figure we will get her done right around her birthday if I choose this to be the best option. We were going to get it done earlier, but financial issues came along with increased knowledge and I just want to know everyone's opinions. There are also various methods of sterilization. What are the pros/cons of these in your opinions?

NOTE: Yes, I know life with a queen is ****, I know the risk of pyometra and cancer along with neighborhood toms etc. I have lived with Kyra since she was roughly 6 months old. I am not looking for hate and "SPAY NEUTER SPAY NEUTER" I am looking for facts AND opinions(beyond just Bob Barker mentality). I am not saying I am NOT going to do the sterilization, I just want to make an informed decision.
 

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We had Evie spayed at 2 and a half. I was very apprehensive, but everything went fine. She was spayed through her flank (commonplace here in England, I think midline spaying is more common in the US?!). She had no side effects and recovered extraordinarily quickly.

I wouldn't even contemplate having a 'complete' cat (or dog) the risks far outweigh the cons in my opinion.
 

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Have you considered a partial spay?

Our next pets we will find a vet to do a partial. They keep certain parts (hormone producing ones) but remove the stuff needed to house/make the babies. Haha, it's been a long afternoon and my pregnancy brain is horrid right now - so forgive my forgetting words I should know!

As for males, I'm not sure I would ever have an intact male. Especially a cat. I would not hesitate to keep an intact dog, but male cats are a whole 'nother can of worms (that spray! haha ew).

I also am reading up on all this new info, and honestly I would still suggest early s/n for MOST owners. It's easier, it's less dangerous (for preventing pregnancies). However, some people are exceptionally more responsible than others and I wouldn't hesitate to suggest waiting until over a year to s/n.

My female dog was 5 when she got spayed, sadly it was necessary she had a pyro after a failed breeding attempt. My dog got neutered at 9mths.

So I guess my answer is - for most people I would say s/n asap. However, I do not feel that is ALWAYS the only option/best option for the pet. We are taking away their natural hormones for growth.. my 5 y/o is a much more sound pet than my 2y/o who was neutered rather early (at 9mths vs 5 yrs).
 

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Several years ago, a vet fresh out of vet school told me about a study that determined that intact females who are not spayed before reaching sexual maturity substantially increase their chances of developing mammary cancer for every month they go unspayed up to a certain age (I can't remember the age). I believe that by the time a queen is two years old, spaying will no longer reduce the likelihood of developing mammary cancer later in life (which, for some reason, the statistic of 70% more likely to develop mammary cancer sticks in my mind for unspayed queens - but that may not be an accurate memory on my part).

I have never been comfortable with the practice of early spay/neuter. My logical brain can't make peace with eliminating hormones from a very young, growing body. I will not, however, risk pregnancy, and I do not want my 4-legged companions developing a preventable and likely deadly cancer just because I put off spay/neuter too long. So I opt for spay/neuter between 5-6 mos old for both females and males.

Laurie
 

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All 7 of ours are fixed, per say. With 5 queens and two males, I best be doing something! lol We got 3 of the queens sprayed at 6-8 months and have never had a problem from that. The one male was done at 2, and our Dakota was done at 6-8 month period. And with Dakota's extra problem, that could have been an issue, but he been fine(for him) with no issues from being fully neutered. I persaonally think if you not breeding, then animals need to be fixed... but then again I think certian people should be fixed as well.....
 

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Personally when dealing with strays or ferals, I am for 2/2 s/n. mostly because the older they get the harder they are to catch and the more chances of getting pregnant after the 4 month mark. With my own I waited til Sherbert was 2 years old before Neutering to get his growth in, but he was indoor and only outside supervised. All my females except Gypsy were done at 8 months to get growth in. Gypsy was a stray who i fostered and wanted to spay before she went up for adoption, but she was closer to the 4 month mark.

Studies conducted on the benefits or drawbacks of early spaying or neutering were done by the University of Florida. These studies were funded by The Winn Feline Foundation, in conjunction with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). These studies were conducted on animals ranging from 7 weeks old to 12 months old. Those 7 weeks old did not react any differently than those who were 12 months old.


Results from the studies performed in Florida were as follows:

* Growth may be prolonged if the procedure is performed prior to sexual maturity or the animal's first heat. Testosterone and estrogen, although not required, influence growth, maintenance, and aging of the skeleton. Spaying/neutering at seven weeks or seven months of age did not affect the rate of bone growth in male or female cats/dogs when compared with intact cats/dogs. Nonetheless, early spaying or neutering in dogs will result in a delay in the closure of the growth plate by an average of nine weeks. This delay will cause increased bone length in both males and females , however. If the operation is done at seven months of age, the delay will be seen in males only. Therefore, the belief that prepubertal spaying or neutering stunts growth is not true.

* Observations of urinary tract development showed no differences between those altered early and those altered post 7 months (other than the differences related to sex). The investigators measured the diameter of the urethra in the male kittens and found no differences between the groups.

*the neutered animals was just as active as their unaltered counterparts.

* Spaying a female can actually protect her against mammary cancer and uterine infections. In males, neutering reduces the risk of testicular cancer and enlargement of the prostate and related infections.

* younger animals recovered faster.

another study showed
"An infantile appearance of the prepuce and penis has been noted in male cats castrated before five months of age. In these cats, complete extrusion of the penis may not be possible because of incomplete separation of the prepucial lining and the penis."

There was more in various studies about the pros and cons, but most rehash the same info.


Random text characters added by one of the cats trying to help me type /sigh
 

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Also wanted to point out that IMO/experience - cancers tend to not be as prevelant in rawfed pets. So that would also be part of my not wanting to s/n early.
 

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Honestly, I'd spay. I am not a crazy speuter activist. My dogs are intact, and I just go to extra lengths to keep them that way. There is a lot of research cOming along about the potential negatives of speuter. However, cats are a different story. In my opinion, the suffering of a female cat outweighs the risks. The simple truth is either a female breeds or she goes through endless heats. You also have to take into account the risk of door dashing with cats. They are not as easy to contain as dogs. If you're concerned about hormones, do Kyra first. Just be prepared that in Tucker's case he could begin spraying and once that starts it's a pita to stop.
 

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having a 'complete' cat (or dog) the risks far outweigh the cons in my opinion.
Agree, unless you are a breeder I don't know why a pet owner would want entire cats.

The risk of Pyo is very real and very common. Many average pet owners don't even know what to look for to catch it early enough.

I prefer early spay/neuter, the kittens recover so much faster and never have to go through a heat cycle (which often happens at 4 months in my breed). I get my kittens done at 10 weeks before they go to their new families at 12+ weeks.
 

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My vet won't neuter my Savannah until he is at least 6 months old. I don't have to worry about him getting a cat pregnant because the first 5 generations are sterile.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My vet won't neuter my Savannah until he is at least 6 months old. I don't have to worry about him getting a cat pregnant because the first 5 generations are sterile.

Ummmmmmmmmm, If the first FIVE GENERATIONS are sterile, How do you have a F3 Savannah?? F3 means he is three generations removed from the original crossing of the two species of cat....

Meaning:
Wild cat X domestic = F1
F1 X F1= F2
F2 X F2 = F3
Etc etc etc

So if your vet told you that, I would question him...
 

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F3
F2 female and F5 male. Is still a F3

F1= parent is an African Serval
F2= grandparent is a African Serval
F3= great grandparent is a African Serval
Ect, Ect.........
 

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Ummmmmmmmmm, If the first FIVE GENERATIONS are sterile, How do you have a F3 Savannah?? F3 means he is three generations removed from the original crossing of the two species of cat....

Meaning:
Wild cat X domestic = F1
F1 X F1= F2
F2 X F2 = F3
Etc etc etc

So if your vet told you that, I would question him...
Better explaination

Before we talk about genetics let me explain what the classification system for hybrid cats stands for. The “F” classification means how many generations away from a pure African Serval Cat. Each “F” generations can be determined by what the Savannah Cat Mother is for example: F1 mother breed to a F7 male is a F2 savannah. Remember that the ABC’s do not effect what generation the savannah cat is but only define how many savannah cats are in the pedigree. List of example:
Serval x Domestic = F1
(F1 Savannah) x (Male Savannah) = F2
(F2 Savannah) x (Male Savannah) = F3
(F3 Savannah) x (Male Savannah) = F4
(F4 Savannah) x (Male Savannah) = F5
(F5 Savannah) x (Female or Male Savannah) = F6
(F6 Savannah) x (Female or Male Savannah) = F7
The “A” , “B” , “C” or “SBT” means how many savannah cats are in the pedigree of the cat. The ABC’s follow the “F” classification of the cat explained above. The ABC’s are used for new breeds of cat that still allow out crosses of different breeds of cat to help the development of the breed. Interesting for you to know almost every breed of cat was developed by breeding several different breeds together. Example:
Savannah x Domestic = A
(Savannah A) x (Savannah A) = B
(Savannah B) x (Savannah B) = C
(Savannah C) x (Savannah C) = SBT
Everything after “SBT” is considered a purebred cat unless you breed to a cat that is not an “SBT”. As a kitten buyer these classifications can mean nothing if you are just getting a pet. Every cat breed in the entire world is a mixture of several cat breeds combined. If your kitten has a cat that is not considered a purebred cat in its pedigree that does not make your cat a mutt! In fact some of the most amazing cats are classified under “A”s. Any F1 savannah cat every produced is considers an F1A.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just looked it up. Huh, learn something new everyday. Sorry for questioning you, though a small percent are viable, so I wouldn't leave him around any females in season just in case. :p
 

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A little more information,
Why is the F5 generation male the first fertile generation?
• A better question is why are hybrids in general sterile? Sterilization in hybrids is common. A mule is the result of mating a horse to a donkey. Mules are sterile. Researchers at Cornell University have made the first discovery of a gene pair that provokes problems at hybridization. Two genes from two fruit fly species interfere with each other preventing the production of male offspring. The Dobzhansky-Muller model theory was formed in the 1930s that suggests hybrid incompatibilities that cause thing such as death or sterility are caused by genes that have evolved from a common ancestor but diverged in each of the species. The best explanation for sterility in animals so far with limited studies is the unequal crossing over during meiosis that causes deletions and duplications of genetic material. If this always happens because the chromosomes do not align then the animal is sterile. If a critical gene is deleted or duplicated the animal may not survive to term or even to adulthood. F1, F2, F3 and F4 generation savannah cat males cannot reproduce. The F5 generation savannah stud is only 3.12% Serval cat blood. It’s the dilution of the Wild African Serval cat genes that make reproduction in lower generation males possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Maybe I've missed something here but if any generation of cats is sterile, that means no more cats surely?

The males are sterile until the Serval blood is diluted to less than 4% I.E. F5

Females are viable from F1.

There are exceptions though. Some male F1's can breed while some F1 females cannot. :)
 
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