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Eva's thread mentioned the "fridge." That came from the brand name, Frigidare. :) And often, we ask for a Kleenex, when we want a tissue. How many brand names can you think of which have become a part of every day vocabulary?
 

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Its actually annoying me that I can't think of any more to add :)

Maybe vaseline when you mean petroleum jelly? and q-tips for cotton swabs
 

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Down here, we call all soft drinks Coke.
Xerox used to be one, but no so much anymore.
 

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not sure if this is what you were going for:

POP (or soda if you live where I am)
jeans(levis)
used to be an aspirin...now its tylenol, advil...etc
PAMPERS vs diapers
here is a good one...BINKY (aka pacifier)
 

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Saran Wrap instead of plastic wrap

Ziploc for any sandwhich style baggie

Tupperwear for any kind of plastic food storage

Edit - Scotch Tape - for any kind of clear tape
and
TV Guide, instead of program guide
 

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Ace Bandage - elastic bandage
Band-Aids - plastic bandages
Chapstick - lip balm
Jell-O - gelatin dessert
Styrofoam - plastic foam
Teflon - nonstick coating
Velcro - hook and loop fastener
Walkman - portable cassette player with headphones
 

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shlanon said:
Down here, we call all soft drinks Coke.
I have a friend who's husband is from Texas and she told me the same thing. I think it's so funny. How do you order specifics, like what if you want a Mountain Dew or something? Up here in North Dakota a lot of people still say "pop" instead of soda. I say "pop" and my husband says "soda" and we egg each other on about it all the time. He thinks North Dakota needs to get with it and start saying "soda" like everybody else.

As for the question on the thread, my mom and I refer to all tampons and pads as Kotex. I know a lot of people who say Cool Whip no matter what brand of whipped topping they are using. Mismodliz took all the good ones! :p
 

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ndkittymom, if you are ordering one then you would say specifically "I would like a Dr. Pepper" But more casually one might say "Do we have any more cokes?" referring to any soft drinks or "Do you want a coke?" "Yes" "What kind?" "Dr. Pepper." :D
I thought of another one today...Pepto Bismol for stomach medicine.
 

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I dated a guy who called paper towels "Scott Towels". Actually, his entire family did this and it drove me crazy!!

Lollipops of all sorts, whether it be a tootsie-pop, blow pop, etc. are ALL called "suckers" here (chicago). This is a major pet-peeve of mine, for some reason I just cringe every time I hear someone say, "May I have a 'sucker'?"
GRRRRR. It's just wrong!

Also, when I lived in florida, most of my friends would ask if you wanted a "coke", but most of the time they poured you a glass of some type of soda that was not Coke! Coke simply means "soda" where I lived. Strange!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Believe it or not, Webster lists it:

Main Entry: 1suck·er
Pronunciation: 's&-k&r
Function: noun

4 : LOLLIPOP
5 a : a person easily cheated or deceived b : a person irresistibly attracted by something specified <a sucker for ghost stories> c -- used as generalized term of reference <see if you can get that sucker working again>
_____________________________

It is not listed as either slang or substandard. When I was a child, almost everyone used the word "sucker" instead of lollipop. I seldom hear it any more, but it appears to be standard American English. When I think of a sucker, I think of a new plant shooting out from an established plant.
 

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Oh, how terrible. It's official now. Geez, how will I ever get them to abandon this word now that you've brought this to my attention?

It's just an awful term for something "sweet".
 

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mismodliz said:
Ace Bandage - elastic bandage
Band-Aids - plastic bandages
Chapstick - lip balm
Jell-O - gelatin dessert
Styrofoam - plastic foam
Teflon - nonstick coating
Velcro - hook and loop fastener
Walkman - portable cassette player with headphones
I'm guilty of medicine brand names, Band-Aids, Jell-O, Scotch Tape, Chapstick, Saran-Wrap, Tupperware and Vaseline.

But I've always said photocopying as opposed to Xeroxing, although Xerox did invent that process (I took a printing course).

However, I think styrofoam is a type of foam (I don't think it's a brandname), and Velcro is a type of fastener I think too - like how button is a word and not a name. Also - I think Teflon is a patented thing, so it would be okay to use regularly because they're nothing else like it (I don't think there are any other non-stick coatings?).
 

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tissues or kleenex

Its interesting that some of these are the same in UK, others not. From Mismodiz's list we'd use Teflon, Velcro and Walkman - but not the others listed. I used to hear people say 'Lipsil' for lip balm, but I don't think that's in use so much now.
We wouldn't call anything 'coke' unless it was cola of some sort.
A cat-related one from the past...in the sixties it was common to call dry food 'Felix' as that was the only brand you could get. But now there are all sorts, and Felix comes in cans and pouches too. So we tend to call the dry food 'biscuits'
The only other one I can think of is 'Tannoy' = public address system.

seashell
 

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I was racking my brain trying to think of one and then I looked at my desk and I saw I have a bottle of water called pump - lots of people refer to bottles of spring water as Pump- even though it's a brand.

Cool thread! :wink:
 
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