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So today I decided to make some home made kitty treats and after doing a fairly extensive search I wasn't very pleased with the majority of recipes I found. Most of them contained something I knew wasn't particularly good for our kids. Lots of the recipes contained wheat or corn flour, milk, and other stuff that I thought may be questionable. That got me thinking about people foods that might actually be toxic if given to them. So like any good guardian I embarked on a Google Search. I also admit it was due in part to my big boy. I knew alcohol wasn't good for cats but I had no idea how toxic it was. He would be a wino if I let him and I can't leave a glass on the table 'cause he's already demonstrated that he's just waiting for me to leave before embarking on a quick binge. BTY, he prefers whites. But I digress.....

To say I was shocked at some of the foods that are downright harmful would be an understatement. These are ingredients that I have seen on many labels for not only foods and treats, but flea remedy's. Also the toxicity may not occur immediately either, it can be cumulative over time in some instances. So this was really a lesson in reading labels as well.
 

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Most of those things should not be eaten by humans either. I do feed Missy small amounts of tuna or sardine. I use it to give her the Metamucil she needs. I add taurine as this is mostly what they it lacks. (It works. She's far healthier in that respect than she was when I brought her home.)

MIlk is the one that puzzles me. Years ago when I lived in England where I was born, cats always enjoyed a saucer of milk. So now, here in Canada, I gave Missy some milk and she vomited within half an hour.

I noticed that the two sites had slightly different things to say about fat. I wonder what the raw foood people have to say about that. I agree that too much liver is probably not good for cats, but cougars who are sick go straight for the liver of their prey (be it animal or human), so I understand.

Good links. Thanks for posting.
 

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I am always surprised at what is on the list. Like "COOKED meat in small amounts occasionally are OK but better talk to your Vet and follow the directions on the bag" (that was on the 2nd link) .. which more times then not actually has the toxic stuff in it, like avocados, potatoes, onion and garlic.. ect.

Liver contains high amounts of Vitamin A, which is good in small doses, but which can be toxic if consumed at high levels. If cats eat liver every day, they soon start to suffer from a condition known as Hypervitaminosis A. A sick animal might go for the liver though because vitamin A increases immune responses in the body.
 

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MIlk is the one that puzzles me. Years ago when I lived in England where I was born, cats always enjoyed a saucer of milk. So now, here in Canada, I gave Missy some milk and she vomited within half an hour.
I think with milk it depends a lot on the individual cat. Some can tolerate it, some just can't. Sassy loves milk, and she still gets a little bit every now and then. It's never upset her tummy so I figure it's ok to let her have small doses occasionally. But Moxie won't go near milk. Or cream. My brother says she threw up after having some milk a few months ago, and I guess now she knows it doesn't agree with her. She's a smart girl.

That stuff about the liver and immune response is very interesting. I feed raw to my cats, and they both love liver. They only get it once a week because they can overdose on vitamin A if they get too much (because excess is stored in the body instead of something like taurine, which is just excreted in the urine when they eat too much). I wonder how much liver it would take to cause Hypervitaminosis A.
 

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When kittens are born, they have the enzyme necessary to break down and digest lactose (dairy). Once they are weaned, they stop producing that particular enzyme and the ability to properly digest lactose. If, however, they continue to be fed dairy after the time when they would be otherwise weaned from milk by their mothers, they never stop producing the enzyme necessary for digesting lactose, and they don't have any problem consuming dairy products.

So, if you want to be able to feed your cats dairy products without causing digestive upset, don't ever stop feeding them dairy long enough for that particular enzyme production to cease. OTOH, dairy is not a natural part of the feline diet past kittenhood. You're altering their natural physiology by continuing to feed dairy into adulthood, and who knows what sort of long-term physical effects that may have. For one thing, dairy is high in phosphorus, and phos is hard on kidneys as they age and start to lose function.

Laurie
 

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When kittens are born, they have the enzyme necessary to break down and digest lactose (dairy). Once they are weaned, they stop producing that particular enzyme and the ability to properly digest lactose. If, however, they continue to be fed dairy after the time when they would be otherwise weaned from milk by their mothers, they never stop producing the enzyme necessary for digesting lactose, and they don't have any problem consuming dairy products.

So, if you want to be able to feed your cats dairy products without causing digestive upset, don't ever stop feeding them dairy long enough for that particular enzyme production to cease. OTOH, dairy is not a natural part of the feline diet past kittenhood. You're altering their natural physiology by continuing to feed dairy into adulthood, and who knows what sort of long-term physical effects that may have. For one thing, dairy is high in phosphorus, and phos is hard on kidneys as they age and start to lose function.

Laurie
This is interesting and makes sense for most cats, but Sassy wasn't fed any dairy when she was young. I'm lactose intolerant myself, so when we adopted Sassy there was no milk in our house at all. The first time she would have been given milk she would have been four or five years old, when my brother started refusing to drink soy and rice milk and insisted my parents buy real milk for him. She was still able to digest dairy four or five years after being weaned.
 

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This is interesting and makes sense for most cats, but Sassy wasn't fed any dairy when she was young. I'm lactose intolerant myself, so when we adopted Sassy there was no milk in our house at all. The first time she would have been given milk she would have been four or five years old, when my brother started refusing to drink soy and rice milk and insisted my parents buy real milk for him. She was still able to digest dairy four or five years after being weaned.
I'm sure it's possible that certain individuals never shut off lactose enzyme production after weaning. It's also possible that the foods you were feeding Sassy contained dairy ingredients of which you were unaware (casein, whey, cheese, milk derivatives, etc.).

Laurie
 
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