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I'm new to this board, little experience with cats and need a little help and guidance. I'm sorry in advance that I can't seem to figure out how to make paragraphs yet so this post is going to be one very long paragraph! About two months ago I discovered to kittens had made a home in my garage. For quite some time I could only get an occasional glimpse of them because they liked to stay hidden. I put food and water down for them every day and slowly gained their trust. It took nearly 2 months before one of the kittens finally became very friendly with me, lets me pet her and hold her and the other kitten was getting close. Not knowing what I was doing, I had a plan to wait for both kittens to trust me enough so that I could take them to a vet together and then figure out how to find a home for them. Every morning for a very long time now the kittens would wait for me to bring their breakfast and lunch and dinner and snack etc. They're quite bonded and always together. This morning there was only one kitten. I spent the morning walking around in the ran looking for a hurt or dead 2nd kitty. I drove around the neighborhood looking for it. Nothing. I don't know what could have happened to her. What do I do now? I'm scared for the remaining kitty's safety. I'm sad for him because I know he misses his littermate and I'm sad for the other kitty. Do I bring the kitten in for the night? I'm sure it will freak him out to be inside. I'm concerned about my animals, I have two parrots and a gentle dog. I don't want the animals exposed to possible disease from the kitten. Do I wait until the other kitten comes back before taking the remaining kitten to the vet? If I take the kitten to the vet and the other one comes back looking for her mate, will she leave if the kitten isn't there? Please, what's my next step?? Thank you for any and all advice.
 

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The way I look at it... better for the kitten to be freaked out but SAFE, inside with you. It's possible something did happen to the other kitten, and for that reason I would probably try to get the remaining one inside asap. Both cats are used to you feeding them, so if the other kitten does come back I think it's likely she'll stick around because she knows that you will bring her food. Then you can get her too. In fact it might be better for her not to see you 'catnap' her brother, since I imagine wrangling two kittens at once wouldn't be easy.

When you bring the kitten inside all you need to do is keep him separate from your own animals. You should set him up in his own room with food, water, litter box and somewhere he can hide. That way he can get used to you, to being inside, and to the smell and sound of your other animals. Keep him in a separate room until you can get him to a vet to be checked over.

It just occurred to me actually - I take it you know the genders of both kittens, as you know the female is the one that's missing. Is it possible she's gone into heat, and has wondered off in search of a male? I've read that female cats can go into heat as young as five months. It's possible the male kitten hasn't quite reached maturity yet, so he's stayed behind while his sister seeks out some male attention.

I think it's really wonderful of you to care about these kittens. Good luck to you and the kitties - hopefully the female comes back ok, and the two of them take well to living inside with you. Either way it's really kind of you to care about them enough to take care of them up to now.
 

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I'm new to this board, little experience with cats and need a little help and guidance. I'm sorry in advance that I can't seem to figure out how to make paragraphs yet so this post is going to be one very long paragraph! About two months ago I discovered to kittens had made a home in my garage. For quite some time I could only get an occasional glimpse of them because they liked to stay hidden. I put food and water down for them every day and slowly gained their trust. It took nearly 2 months before one of the kittens finally became very friendly with me, lets me pet her and hold her and the other kitten was getting close. Not knowing what I was doing, I had a plan to wait for both kittens to trust me enough so that I could take them to a vet together and then figure out how to find a home for them. Every morning for a very long time now the kittens would wait for me to bring their breakfast and lunch and dinner and snack etc. They're quite bonded and always together. This morning there was only one kitten. I spent the morning walking around in the ran looking for a hurt or dead 2nd kitty. I drove around the neighborhood looking for it. Nothing. I don't know what could have happened to her. What do I do now? I'm scared for the remaining kitty's safety. I'm sad for him because I know he misses his littermate and I'm sad for the other kitty. Do I bring the kitten in for the night? I'm sure it will freak him out to be inside. I'm concerned about my animals, I have two parrots and a gentle dog. I don't want the animals exposed to possible disease from the kitten. Do I wait until the other kitten comes back before taking the remaining kitten to the vet? If I take the kitten to the vet and the other one comes back looking for her mate, will she leave if the kitten isn't there? Please, what's my next step?? Thank you for any and all advice.
How old are the kittens now? The most pertinent question!

An unspayed or unneutered cat can disappear for several weeks on end and then reappear. Don’t give up hope. Just have food waiting in the usual spot. Take your remaining kitten in to the vet or low cost spay neuter clinic immediately to be s/n. If female, she can get pregnant at 6 months old. Don’t chance that. Her buddy will stick around if she isn’t there, if the food source is there.

It’s not impossible to socialize an older kitten or cat but it takes time and commitment. Common TNR rule of thumb is we don’t bring in kittens after they are 12 weeks old. Not that they can’t be tamed but that the feral tendencies are stronger by then and takes more consistent effort to bring them around.

You will need a separate room to bring this kitten or teenager around. The kitten will be terrified at first so don’t expect it to respect you or your pets or your household items. That is why keeping it in a small bathroom is a good place to originally start.

The most important and best thing you can do for both these kittens (if the other shows up again) is to get them spayed or neutered. The male won’t feel like marking your garage and territory of its neighborhood. They both won’t feel the need to wander and mate, which in turns keeps them safer. Plus vaccinations given during s/n will keep them safe from common feline diseases like felv and fiv.

Cats or kittens can’t bring in diseases to your other pets. They may bring in fleas or a parasite from their poo in their cat box like Giardia etc. But those are all very treatable and not a biggie.

Kitty Boot Camp by Heidi is the best I’ve seen on socializing. Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums - View Single Post - Kitty Cat Boot Camp

If your kittens are younger then the 3 Utube videos by Urban Cat League are the best I’ve come across. You can even use some of the tips in there for older kittens or semi-ferals. Tough Love: Socializing Feral Kittens (Part 1 of 3) - YouTube

You sound like a very compassionate person. I hope your other kitty shows up again. Keep asking us questions. We’re here to help.
 

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It is more than just possible to socialize a cat/kitten over 12 weeks. I have done it quite often. My rescues this year are only about 9 weeks and are currently ensconced in my quarantine room (extra bedroom) with their mother. Rosie is about 18 months old and her former owner stopped feeding her when she found out Rosie had kittens. She figured if she didn't feed the mother then the kittens would starve. What happened was Rose continued to be a very good mom and was at the brink of starvation when my BFF and I snatched her and the two remaining kittens up.

Rosie is semi-tame and becoming tamer by leaps and bounds. The female kitten, Dora the Explorer, is wary and prefers not to be touched, but is very playful and cannot resist a string toy. The tom kitten, Silver, is going to be the hard sell and hides all the time I am in the quarantine room.

The plan is to provide food, water, safety and time. Never force human contact on them, wait for them to come to me. Rosie will probably be out of the quarantine room within two weeks. She and the kittens are already determined to be FeLk and FeAids negative. As soon as she has her shots and is coming to me for socialization, she will be allowed out of the room. Rosie is really ready to get away from the kittens and the large room has made it easier for her to get away from them. The kittens should be ready for new homes come Thanksgiving or Christmas, if they follow the usual time line for taming kittens.
 

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If you watch the videos or read Heidi’s Kitty Boot Camp, it isn’t about "forcing" yourself on a cat to socialize it. It’s about techniques of gently nudging its comfort levels to bring the cat around.

It’s been my experience, if you wait for a cat to come around, it never will. Then you will have a partially socialized kitten and they get returned when adopted out. The work is to be done now before they go up for adoption, to ensure a permanent home.

The general public wants a kitten they don’t have to work with to make it comfortable with them.

Make sure the kittens are spayed and neutered before you adopt them out. FYI, tests for FeLV and FIV are not always accurate in kittens. You have to wait until they are a year old. Even then the snap test only shows when they are shedding the virus. If you had the mom tested that is the best indicator for the kittens so far.

It was super kind of you to rescue the mom and kittens. I’m always amazed at the sheer unfeeling ignorance of people thinking starving can motivate a cat. Thank goodness you were there to rescue them and change their lives for the good.
 

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I am sorry Mitts and Tess, I was not criticizing or anything. Just stating what I do. And yes, you can be sure the kittens will be spayed and neutered when they are rehomed, as well as microchipped. As soon as I get Rosie away from her kittens she has a date with SNAP for surgery.

Yes, it was the mother we had checked for leukemia and aids. The kittens will be checked before their spay surgery in a few months.

Where as you say you have no luck with older kittens taming themselves, I have to say I have never had a failure with even two and three year old ferals taming themselves. It just takes time and patience which I have since I only am able to rescue two or three a year and do no deal with large quantities of cats like other rescues have to. I am not just bragging here, I am being honest. One three year old cat I had for two years before he was social with humans and when I finally placed him in a home, I was honest with the new caretakers Whip was not a cuddly cat. They said that was what they wanted. I visited WhiperSnapper often over the period of three years after he was placed and he established a bond with their older queen cat and their youngest child. Whip absolutely loved that little boy and ended up sleeping with the child every night. I was surprised at how tame Whip turned out.

With all the cats I place, I have a no fault return policy. If the cat does not work out, they can give them back without problem. I have only ever had one returned and it was because of allergies, not that they didn't want the cat. I still have China as one of my own.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you, everyone. The other kitty came back last night after dark. Me and her sibling were both VERY happy to see her! She ate a ton of food last night and the two kittens stayed together through the night and are together still right now. My best guess at their age is an uneducated guess but I think they're 16 to 18 weeks of age.

Can we go over the steps I need to take? The first thing I need to do right away is get them into a carrier and take them to the vet for medical (whatever that is that a vet does for a cat) and spay/neuter.

The next step after that is what??? It took near 2 months of daily interaction and a lot of patience to get the kittens to trust me. The boy kitten rolls over and lets me pet his belly. He jumps on my lamp and purrs up a storm. The girl kitty isn't quite there and I think she may be more limited in terms of how much attention she'll ever want from a human. She's very skittish but she finally comes to me for pets and play and she will purr. But if I move to quickly she's out of there like a bat out of ****. She won't let me pick her up yet. I learned my lesson after trying to once, but I'll risk it again in order to drop her into a carrier.

She's special and I adore her. I don't know what it is that makes the two kittens so different in temperament. It could be as simple as genetics or a trauma that may have happened to the one kitten. Or it might be the role of the girl cat. I've been watching them for two months and the female cat seemed to be the protector of the two.

I have an awful lot of respect for the kittens and their fight for survival. I cannot allow them to be separated and it's going to take a special person to give the kittens a home and where do I find that person??
 

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IF you can get them into a carrier, that would be easiest. Or if they are still too skittish you can put - two have a hart traps out, to get them in. TNR groups and rescues that TNR will lend you traps, normally. We can tell you how to bait the traps.

Google “Low cost spay neuter” then your “town’s name” and see what comes up. That would be the most cost effective route to take. When you take them in to be s/n request all vaccinations, check for fleas and ear mites. A general once over check while they are under.

If they are females they will need a 3 day recovery from spay. Don’t just let them back out of doors right away. Do you have a dog kennel? My TNR friends usually let ferals recover in a kennel. You don’t want them to rip their incisions during recovery. That is why we keep females 3 days. Male one day.

Cats can recover in a trap, which is what some groups do. Or bring them in to the vet in a trap; have them put them in a big carrier after surgery for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It seems as though getting them to the vet is going to be the easiest part. The boy kitty will be no trouble getting him into a carrier. The girl kitten, not so much. I can do it although I'm sure I'll get hurt in the process but that's ok.

The tricky part comes after they heal from s/n. I can't just release them back outside. I'm working against the "weather" clock. I'm in Michigan and the cool weather is rolling in quickly. These two little stinkers aren't going to want to be out in the cold and I think they're suited to be in a home. How do I find that home?

I have two parrots that are both flighted and not confined to a cage. I'm afraid that I'll put their lives in danger if I keep the kittens.
 

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I am sorry Mitts and Tess, I was not criticizing or anything. Just stating what I do. And yes, you can be sure the kittens will be spayed and neutered when they are rehomed, as well as microchipped. As soon as I get Rosie away from her kittens she has a date with SNAP for surgery.

Yes, it was the mother we had checked for leukemia and aids. The kittens will be checked before their spay surgery in a few months.

Where as you say you have no luck with older kittens taming themselves, I have to say I have never had a failure with even two and three year old ferals taming themselves. It just takes time and patience which I have since I only am able to rescue two or three a year and do no deal with large quantities of cats like other rescues have to. I am not just bragging here, I am being honest. One three year old cat I had for two years before he was social with humans and when I finally placed him in a home, I was honest with the new caretakers Whip was not a cuddly cat. They said that was what they wanted. I visited WhiperSnapper often over the period of three years after he was placed and he established a bond with their older queen cat and their youngest child. Whip absolutely loved that little boy and ended up sleeping with the child every night. I was surprised at how tame Whip turned out.

With all the cats I place, I have a no fault return policy. If the cat does not work out, they can give them back without problem. I have only ever had one returned and it was because of allergies, not that they didn't want the cat. I still have China as one of my own.
I know it’s hard to tell over the internet but in no way did I think you were criticizing me. I’m very direct in my postings so it may come off that way. But trust me; it’s hard to offend me. I’m very laid back, quiet and non emotional in real life.

I just saw your intro and you’ve been in this many more years than I have. You obviously have your act together. I’m a total believer in there’s many ways to do things. Just when we think we’ve got it figure out someone shares a better way! I’m far from an expert. I’ve only been in this since 2006 with TNR and Rescue. I only know what has worked for me and my group. I’m on a giant learning curve.

I wrongly assume people don’t always know about things. Things I’ve had to learn the hard way so I pass on info just in case someone doesn’t know. I’ve learned a lot on Cat Forum and from my vet and from my cat savvy friends. I’m still on the journey! So please share your opinions and experiences. They count!

I made a comment awhile back; it takes a village to save a cat. It’s true. It’s all of us united together to help a cat or cats.
 

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It seems as though getting them to the vet is going to be the easiest part. The boy kitty will be no trouble getting him into a carrier. The girl kitten, not so much. I can do it although I'm sure I'll get hurt in the process but that's ok.

The tricky part comes after they heal from s/n. I can't just release them back outside. I'm working against the "weather" clock. I'm in Michigan and the cool weather is rolling in quickly. These two little stinkers aren't going to want to be out in the cold and I think they're suited to be in a home. How do I find that home?

I have two parrots that are both flighted and not confined to a cage. I'm afraid that I'll put their lives in danger if I keep the kittens.
I'm not at all experienced in TNR or ferals, but I went through almost exactly the same situation you are with the cat who's currently sleeping on my lap. I'm just going to give you whatever advice I can, and wish you luck with whatever you decide to do. You're very kind to want to help these cats, and they're lucky to have found someone like you :thumb

To me it doesn't sound like you're dealing with feral cats at all. Ferals want nothing or very little to do with people - you definitely wouldn't be able to pick up and cuddle a feral cat. I agree with you that both cats are perfectly suited to being in a home, and are better off out of the cold. You wouldn't need to TNR them. They sound semi-tame already, just in need of being in an environment where they're safe, where they can relax and get used to people. If you're willing to provide that (and bless your heart if you are), here's what I'd suggest.

The male cat sounds like he will be easy to catch. The female is going to be your challenge, but there are a few things you can do. If you think you can get close enough to grab her you can wear a heavy coat or a hoody/sweater/a couple of long sleeves shirts to protect yourself if you think she'll scratch or bite. You can even wear gloves to protect your hands, but you'll want to make sure they won't hinder your ability to grab and keep hold of her. She sounds like the smarter, more reserved cat - she's a survivor. If you grab or make a grab for her and she escapes it might be a long time before she trusts you enough to let you have another chance.

Another thing you can do that might be easier is try to get her to walk into the kennel herself. If you're feeding them at scheduled times start bringing a kennel with you. They might be curious enough to walk right in to explore it, OR you can entice them in by putting a can of smelly tuna/salmon/sardines, cooked chicken, or even just their regular food in the back of the kennel. Concentrate on getting the female this way. Just stand or sit near the kennel, wait until she walks all the way in after the food, and calmly close the door behind her. If you can I would give this method a try first - much safer for you, and much less stressful for the cat :)

It's up to you how you decide to organize taking them to the vet. If you're worried about making an appointment and then not being able to catch the cats that day then just catch the cats before making an appointment. Set them up inside a room, and then make the appointment. As long as they're behind a closed door they can't harm your other pets. Then at least they'll be out of the cold, and there will be no chance of them wondering off before you can help them. Just remember that every day that female cat is out there is another day she could go into heat and get pregnant. You're an angel for helping them, but you don't need to be responsible for a bunch of kittens too :? As well, if you are going to re-home these cats it's a lot easier to do while they're still young. It's sad but true that people usually want kittens and not older cats.

If you do decide you want to keep the cats I think you can do it safely for everyone involved. If you don't mind me asking, what kind of parrots do you have? A larger breed might not even register to a cat as being 'prey', or might be scary enough to a young kitten that they never even think to try. It'll absolutely depend on the cats and how they act around your parrots, but if you have larger birds or cats who don't have a high hunting drive they could co-exist ok while under supervision. Never forget however that cats are hunters, and those instincts are there somewhere. If it were me I would always make sure cats and parrots were separated by a closed door while I was at work or out for long periods. You can just keep a safe room set up for the cats and put them in there before you leave the house. Maybe it's not ideal, but those cats are so much better off warm and safe and fed with someone who cares about them, rather than free to freeze their tails off out on their own.

Of course I'm not telling you that you have to keep the cats, or even that you should. Just saying that it might be possible, depending on the animals involved and if you really want to. If you are going to re-home the cats good people can be found. Talk to family and friends, put up flyers at the vets office, see if you have a local shelter or rescue group who will put the cats up on their website. Be prepared however that it might take some time to find them a good home. Until then they can live just fine in one room of your house, separate from your other animals. Just spend some time with them every day, and get them toys to keep them entertained ('toys' can be twist ties, milk jugs rings, and old socks, so you don't have to break the bank to keep them amused :wink). If you're mind is set on taking them in it'll be a bit of work, but it can be done. And you'll be improving their lives unbelievably.

Good luck to you and the kitties, and keep us updated! (and post pictures if you can :p)
 

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Another thing you can do that might be easier is try to get her to walk into the kennel herself. If you're feeding them at scheduled times start bringing a kennel with you. They might be curious enough to walk right in to explore it, OR you can entice them in by putting a can of smelly tuna/salmon/sardines, cooked chicken, or even just their regular food in the back of the kennel. Concentrate on getting the female this way. Just stand or sit near the kennel, wait until she walks all the way in after the food, and calmly close the door behind her. If you can I would give this method a try first - much safer for you, and much less stressful for the cat :)
This. I agree with catinthemirror. Easier, safer and less stressful, well said. :smile: You can even get the two of them inside and when they're eating that smelly tuna, just close the door, as catinthemirror said.

Good luck with everything, and please keep us posted. If you have other concerns, I'd be happy to help. I don't have a lot of experience, but I've trapped a bunch of ferals -real wild feral cats- and done the TNR (trap-neuter-release) -or found homes for the ones I could socialize- a few times.

Thank you so much for doing this! :wink
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ferals want nothing or very little to do with people - you definitely wouldn't be able to pick up and cuddle a feral cat.
It took two months for me and the kittens to get to where we are. The first couple weeks I was only able to get an occasional glance at a dark shadow of something moving in my backyard during the night even after I began leaving food out.

Eventually a little kitty was brave enough (hungry enough) to show himself in the light of day to eat some food. But that didn't come without the most evil hissing at me. He hissed for a couple more weeks and in that time I started to sneak a quick "touch" in here and there. That turned into him letting me put a finger on him for a little longer but only when he was eating. It was like he was tolerating my doing this.

One evening, after about a month, I thought I saw another shadow move in the night and a few days later I spotted a second kitten in the morning. This one wanted nothing to do with me or the food I was offering and ran quickly out of sight. As time went on, the second kitten began to show herself to eat the food along with the first kitten but hissed up a storm and darted if I moved. It's hard to imagine that these two kittens were ever exposed to humans prior to me. Also, I've lived in my home for the last 19 years and I have to believe that if two kittens were missing from a home, I would have heard about it. I would love it if that were the case so I could return them to their home.

I have a sulphur crested cockatoo and a quaker parrot. The cockatoo is a big guy but the quaker is little. I've watched one of the kittens kill a chipmunk in front of me and another time, a little bird. They are quite adept at hunting for sure. Keeping them in a room away from the birds is a solution that I might have to take until I can find the kittens a home. But as a long term solution, I don't think would be fair to the cats. I would love to keep them, though. Thank you for the ideas on how to keep myself safe while capturing them and capturing them in a way that might cause them the least amount of stress. I will update. Thank you all!
 

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Oh I wasn't trying to suggest that the kittens belonged to somebody - if an unaltered, uncollared, tattoo-less cat is running around any 'owner' it might have is irresponsible beyond all reason anyway - but it sounds most likely those kittens haven't had much positive human contact before you. I just meant that those kittens are well are their way to being tame already, thanks to your patients with them, so they could most likely easily adjust to living inside with people. Feral cats that can't be tamed usually can't make that adjustment, which is why they require being TNR'd and not trapped and adopted. Or at least that's my understanding :)

What you've done with those two is exactly what I did with my Moxie. It does take a lot of time and patients but it works. She's once again napping in my lap as I type this :p At the end of the day they really are worth all the work and worry.

Oh I've wanted a cockatoo since I was a little kid! I think they're absolutely gorgeous - what's his (or her) name? I think a bird that size would be less threatened by a loose cat, especially since you keep them flighted, but you're right to worry about the little guy. Especially since the cats are such good hunters. It's probably best not to chance it. For now, a room to themselves is definitely the best option. And even if it's not exactly ideal to keep them there long term, I feel it is way, way better than the alternative. A one room apartment is way better than being homeless in the winter :? You're doing a great thing, and I'll keep my fingers crossed that everything goes smoothly for you! Good luck with everything
 

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if an unaltered, uncollared, tattoo-less cat is running around any 'owner' it might have is irresponsible beyond all reason anyway
I know, right?! It makes me SO angry that two kittens are living in my garage. It just breaks my heart and I can't understand why s/n laws aren't in place.

The cockatoo is a beauty and the quaker is a little stinker. He swears at me in a little cartoon voice and it's pretty funny. But birds, any bird specie, have no business in captivity. They're flock creatures and meant to fly. They're highly intelligent and emotional and it takes a lot of sacrifice on the part of a human to give a bird, especially the parrots, somewhat of a quality life. Birds are my primary area of interest and I could go on and on but seeing how this is a cat forum, I probably shouldn't..lol

The female kitten hangs out during the day in a pocket in the rafters in my garage. It's hard to explain the pocket but it's a place that I can't get at. I'm waiting for her to come down.
 

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If your kittys are able to be handled by the vet it is OK if you bring them in, in a carrier. If they arent, some, vets want them brought in a trap. Some Humane Societys request that too. Check ahead of time when youve found where you want to s/n your sweet kitties!
 

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It seems as though getting them to the vet is going to be the easiest part. The boy kitty will be no trouble getting him into a carrier. The girl kitten, not so much. I can do it although I'm sure I'll get hurt in the process but that's ok.

The tricky part comes after they heal from s/n. I can't just release them back outside. I'm working against the "weather" clock. I'm in Michigan and the cool weather is rolling in quickly. These two little stinkers aren't going to want to be out in the cold and I think they're suited to be in a home. How do I find that home?

I have two parrots that are both flighted and not confined to a cage. I'm afraid that I'll put their lives in danger if I keep the kittens.
Hi PennyToad, like you my path also recently crossed with some feral kittens and I'll share my experience with you regarding getting your kittens to the vets and finding them space inside.

Firstly, we borrowed a trap from a local cat association who also help with the vet bills, and will help adopt out the kittens when they're ready. I reckon you'll probably find a similar association if you do some research. Maybe the local pet store will know of one. Anyway, we used the trap for the mother so we could take her to the vet to be spayed. I put a comfy towel on the bottom of the cage, and at the far end a little egg cup full of smoked salmon. No problems. If you don't feed the kittens, they will eventually succumb to the temptation of a juicy titbit, don't worry.
With the kittens we use a biggish rabbit cage. For a few days we fed them in the cage, so on the day all we had to do was put some food in it, wait and close the latch. We leave this cage in their space all the time now, which they now play in and have no fear of at all. You could be making it a lot easier on yourself (& the vet) by trapping the kittens one at a time. We have four kittens and have to take them in in pairs, which even the vet found a handful!

Secondly, do you have a bathroom, or a room (without the parrots in) you can 'sacrifice' for a month or two? If you get the kittens sterilised, they'll have to stay inside, isolated from other cats for up to 12 days. We let our feral family have the lounge and kitchen, with no entry to our hallway, bedrooms and bathroom. It took a while to remember to close the doors all the time, but now it's just habit!

Anyway, good luck! You're doing a really awesome thing and remember you're not alone.
BTW - To make a new paragraph, you just hit the tab key (on the left of the keyboard) a couple of times.
 
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