Cat Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A new sibling has taken over management of a property where a feral colony of a dozen have been feeding for over five years.

Well, she doesn't want us feeding there. Blah, blah blah liability... Yada, yada, yada unsightly trash...

Two of us are feeding the colony, and are intending to split it, each of us taking responsibility for 6.

They could be in a small enclosure for a few weeks to learn where a new home is, before being released, but would need a much larger pen for permanent residence, which is what I would need to consider. I already have 10 inside cats, and 5 outside ones, from two families. And near daily on nextdoor.com is a missing or found loose, unidentified dog.

How big an enclosure do I need to permanently relocate six adult free-reamers? Recommendations on cubic feet per cat? Will I need a permit?

Any other recommendations or caveats?

Thanx.

(=^..^=)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,204 Posts
Is the current colony spayed/neutered and peaceful? If so, I would inform your new property owner that moving those cats will cause MUCH more troubles for her in the future. New cats will move in, most likely unneutered cats... who will continue reproducing, fighting, spraying on all of the properties, etc... A peaceful feral colony will actually keep out unwanted strays that cause issues. Moving the peaceful colony will just lead to more problems.

Sorry, I don't have any recommendations, but just thought I'd chime in... sadly many people, like your new property manager, don't understand that spayed/neutered feral colonies can be very peaceful, and moving them or getting rid of them isn't always the solution.

Outdoor Cats: Frequently Asked Questions : The Humane Society of the United States
Relocating Feral Cats
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,899 Posts
I am very, very impressed!

Like Mandy, i would put spay and neuter at the top of my list.

I would also be tempted to use the press for support.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Colony status

Thank you for the post.

The colony is about a dozen strong, and ALL have been TNR-ed since I started helping with the feeding two years ago.

The new sibling is being quite the 'b' word, and not interested. Tenants have spoken out on behalf of the cats. The Greek Restaurant owner hasn't seen a rat since they showed up - I guess about 5 years ago.

They seem to be a relatively cohesive group, with no major conflicts, at least at feeding time.

Splitting them up is a last resort, and I don't know if it will separate pairs. But we can't just leave them be.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,137 Posts
Shadowcat, moving a colony is always the last resort. You have a 50/50 chance they will stay and not try to get back to their familiar area.

If you do move them. Find a barn or rancher which would take them. So theyd have shelter and trees to escape into when coyotes come thru. (I see that your in the Phoenix area) Coyotes, the animal kind, are a big threat to the survival of cats in Arizona.

You will have to put up at 4x8 kennel with a peg board zip tied on top so they cant escape. Put up to 4 in each kennel. Feed them in the barn for minimum of 3 weeks if not more so they get use to this being the area of their food source and familar with sights and sounds. Have place for them to hide in. boxes, cubes, shelves.

There are video on Utube of set ups. Then release them. The rancher has to agree to feed and water them daily. They can not survive on the few rodents around the ranch. We supply people who take our barn cat with free food that is donated. Most ranchers dont need our food. They add it to picking up dog food for their animals!

https://youtu.be/sZTwgRYRx-U

They have a nice set up for the ferals in the video. Ive seen chicken coups sold a feed stores that would work too, for a temporary set up in barns.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Relocated free-roaming colony

Mitts & Tess;

Thank you for the reply.

We know that relocating is a last resort, but it is what we are left with.

I co-feed the colony. M is the primary care giver, and has been feeding for around five years. I am, at least, the second of her 'assistants', and having been helping her for about two years.

She and her husband have built an enclosure, I believe around 8'x12', and have seven of the cats. They plan to hold them for a few weeks and release them into their yard.

I have a 6x7x10 enclosure and four cats. My enclosure was built to accomplish what M wants to with a mom and two babies. I already have 4 outside regulars. The mom and surviving baby, now probably pushing three years old, and another pair that have been here for about 6 years now.

The intent and plan is that M and her hubby will build another enclosure like they have, and install it here. Possibly even two more. Into which, the ones I have will move permanently. They will have space, protection from rain and sun, a litter box, or two, and all the 'comforts' of free-roaming, just not as much room.

I am still curious as to a recommended cubic feet to space per cat. They will have 'furniture', cubby-holes - at least one for each cat, and a large one they can gather in, 'elevations' - to be up off the ground.

Though they are friends, I don't want them getting on each other's nerves.

P.S. Breakthrough petting session with 'Jaguar', the 'alpha' of the displaced free-roaming bunch.

He was also very sure to show me how much he and 'Fluff' care for each other.

We have 11 inside-only.

And Cissi goes in and out as she desires. Too much commotion, and out she wants. Too hot, in she comes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,137 Posts
Here is a good video of a large enclosure ( 8 x 8 x eight) and they have a large amount of cats in there. The main thing is a place to hide for their space. Looks like they have over 6 places to hide. Ferals will double up too.

I don't know of an exact square footage suggestion for feral kennels, like you would for in a home for your socialized cats to live comfortably in. Sorry cant help you with that part.

This video has good tips on relocating and what they use and look for in a location to move ferals to, that cant stay where they are!

https://youtu.be/nSzFd9yE2NI

Good luck on your relocating. Thanks for looking out for this colony. Ferals are the forgotten animal in the animal rescue movement. Its encouraging to hear of others caring for them! :thumb
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanx

Mitts & Tess;

Thanx again.

My current enclosure is [email protected] high. I didn't see how many they had in the 8x8x8, but when I look at other pics, I can visualize 3 in an 8x10 for a permanent residence.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top