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So a few days ago I found a kitten at my apartment pool crying in the bushes. Not sure of her age but shes eating wet food and eventually can chew up the solid that i leave for my other cat. I was wondering if anyone could tell me how id describe her color because she looks toroiseshell-esque but she has tabby like striped down her legs and feet and a while belly. Also, what color willl her eyes be cause they are blue now but Ive been told they will not stay that way :( Her name is Bush (dont laugh) I tryed to name her "Haven" after my aprtments Stonehaven but she was hiding in a bush and the name stuck. Also ive been assuming shes female because most of them are right?

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You are right, she is a tortoiseshell and she is a female.
Genetically, she carries both black and red (Oo). She has no agouti (aa), which places bands of color on the hairshafts of tabby cats and this is why she is solid black with no stripes. Agouti only affects black hair, not red, and she has tabby stripes showing in her red hair because that is her underlying tabby pattern. I *think* it is Mackerel Stripes.




Here is a copy/paste about Calico, Tortie and Torbie cat genetics:
I was very confused about the whole Calico, Tortie, Torbie thing when I was trying to learn their differences and it is mostly a difference of 'descriptive name'.
Torties have no agouti but can have white, though I dislike calling them 'calico'. Torbies have tabby stripes all-over and can have white or no white. Torties with enough red fur to show their tabby pattern are not Torbies because they do not have agouti to tabby-band their black fur. Calicos have all three colors (black, red & white) but are generally only called Calico when their color patches are distinct and not mottled or mingled together like the Tortie/Torbie pattern.

Tortoiseshell cats are remarkable because the cat carries both black (o) and red (O) on her pair of XX genes. Females are XX and can carry a color on each X gene. Males are XY and only carry color on the X gene. This is why male calicos are rare because they would have to be a genetic oddity of XXY. Tortie/Torbie cats with White Spotting are commonly called “calico”, especially if their markings have definite patches of black, red and white. When the black and red are ‘marbled together’ that is called Tortoiseshell.
Torties do not carry agouti. Torties who do are called Torbies. Tortoiseshell + Tabby = Torbie.



The defining characteristic of calico or tortoiseshell is the presence of both black and red fur.
Calico is a general descriptive term and usually means three colors; black, red and white in distinct patches. Tortoiseshell (Tortie) is another descriptive term that describes the way the fur colors (black/red) swirl and mingle together like the shell of a tortoise. These cats can have either white markings or no white markings. Torbie cats have an agouti gene that makes their tabby pattern visible; Tortoiseshell + Tabby = Torbie and can also have or not have white markings.
These variations make it difficult to pin down an accurate term that covers all possibilities.

These are what I would call Calico:

This is a Tortoiseshell:
These are Tortie w/ white:

This is a Torbie w/ white, note the tabby stripes:
This is a Torbie w/ no white:

The Torbies above and the Tortie below show very good examples of how the agouti gene affects black fur, but not red fur. The below Tortie has NO agouti so her black fur remains black instead of tabby striped, like the Torbies above. Since agouti only affects black fur, and not red fur ... red tabby pattern stripes will *always* be visible, but they will never be 'ticked' or ‘banded’ like a black-based cat with agouti to band their black hair shafts.



These are my own cats:
Malibu, showing the agouti banding of her Classic Tabby pattern.

Pretty, a Spotted Mackerel, showing her variation of agouti banding.

BooBoo, a self-red Classic Tabby.

This is Floofy, another self-red Mackerel Tabby longhair with Homzyg recessive dense.
 

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Thank you, Jeanie. Short and sweet. :D
 

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:oops: My apologies for posting too much information. I truly did not mean to bore anyone. My bad for being excited about genetics. :oops:
 

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Heidi n Q said:
:oops: My apologies for posting too much information. I truly did not mean to bore anyone. My bad for being excited about genetics. :oops:
I found your post really interesting and learnt a lot from reading it, thankyou! :)
 
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