Cat Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

As I'm sure many of you have read, I am in the beginning stages of transitioning ET to a raw diet. I am new to the city in which I live and I am taking ET to a vet on Monday for the first time since I adopted him (he was seen previously at the SPCA where I got him, of course) for a well visit. I of course want to be forthcoming about ETs diet but I am apprehensive as to what the vet will think. I pretty much had to select a vet without any personal recommendations, although the testimonials/reviews I read online seemed positive (she also is a cat-only vet).

So I guess my question is, how has your veterinarian handled your decision to feed raw? Were they supportive, in different, or totally horrified? What suggestions do you have for initiating these conversations? I hope I won't feel like I need to DEFEND my decision to feed raw, or be talked out of it!

Thanks in advance :)

-BP

Edited to add that ET is doing GREAT with the transition... still on just chicken (feeding 2 meals dry/wet, spaced 8 hrs apart from the middle raw meal) but has had 3 raw meals in the last 3 days!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,540 Posts
I have very progressive vets where I go. They offer behavior consultation, acupuncture, traditional chinese medicine, and homeopathic remedies, so I'm pretty sure they're up to speed on raw, but I've never asked about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,059 Posts
My vets aren't supportive of raw, though only one of them actively tries to talk me out of it. The other occasionally offers me cautions associated with raw feeding, but he knows I've done my homework, so he doesn't fuss about it.

Laurie
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
952 Posts
Unfortunately, the vet I most trust my cats to is not up to speed on the risks/benefits of raw feeding. Heck, he still sells Science Diet. *sigh*

I have an annual scheduled with all five cats on 9 November and unless I'm cornered into it, I'm not even going to think about what the cats eat. 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I am really disappointed about what you are telling me, but not surprised. I read the FNES article posted... I can't believe some places even require raw fed animals to be isolated. Absolutely ridiculous.

I can definitely see where "lying" is best, especially if telling the truth could compromise your cat's care :evil:

Thank you, and please keep your experiences and stories coming.

-BP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
709 Posts
Just recently our vet has actually called me out for raw ruining my dogs teeth (3 year old chi). Funniest thing is... we only got her 6mths before she went in for her dental. They admitted once I asked if 6mths was enough time to do that damage, that is was NOT my fault..

BUT - before asking why I sent a couple raw meatballs instead of kibble/canned they automatically start reaming me out that "all you feed her is ground beef" (it was actually LAMB- thankyouverymuch).

So no. I would not mention raw to my vet. Ever.

We have found a new vet now, who I asked a couple yrs ago what he thought of me raw feeding (when my cat broke his leg we went to him and we were just starting the transition) and he said "I wouldn't suggest it but they're your cats". I like this attitude much better than "OMG YOU'RE KILLING YOUR DOG/CATS!!!" (which just makes me SO mad!).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,681 Posts
We've been lucky - the office where we take Gracie has a very well-informed main vet and they just added a second vet who is a naturopath, who is very supportive of raw food. She attributed Gracie's good dental health to the raw food, and also her lack of major problems with fleas. Even so, they sell prescription canned food and other mainstream things through the office, too.

Fran
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I know what you mean about feeling like I have to defend my decision to feed raw to combat the ignorance and hostility to feeding raw i remind my self why i feed what i feed. Substandard meat that is cooked beyond edibility and sever lack of nutrition ect. I am going to assume that you are well informed and know what your doing (if not this a great place to find what you need :D ) so make sure you can give a reasonable explanation to the vet if necessary and don't worry about it. You are responsible for ET's care not the vet. The vet is just hired help to assist you in that endeavor. Another thing you don't have to tell the vet that you feed raw and you don't have to lie just don't say anything unless asked and if the vet throws a fit this might not be the vet for you, just a thought. Good luck
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,746 Posts
Well, in my case, I just make sure I know my stuff. I don't lie, but I don't ask "permission," either. My vet knows I feed raw -- he looks at my critters and they look awesome, and he keeps his mouth shut about it. If you're tentative, you're opening a door. If you're clear that this is what you're doing and come off as knowlegable about it, most vets won't be insistent.

My vet is similar re: vaccinations. He doesn't push, but offers me the options and I decide. We had a discussion just today about the rabies vax for the dogs. Our state has a REALLY eff'd up law that, while saying 3 years is what the state requires, leaves a loophole for COUNTIES to require more frequent vax than the state. The next county over allows 3 year; my county insists on 1 year. So I'm gonna get the 3-year and I'll have a license that says it was the 3-year but it will only technically be good for 1 year for the county. If anything happens (i.e, one of the dogs bites someone) I'm fairly sure I can manipulate things my way b/c of the state law. My vet says he agrees that it's stupid and thinks everyone should just do 3-year licensing. But he can't do it in my case b/c I live in the bad county and he could get in trouble. Which I understand. <sigh>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
580 Posts
Jack recently went into the vet with a possible UTI issue. I'll be honest, Jack btalks a lot, thats his purrsonality. Because of our move the cats litter boxes were in our room and whilst trying to sleep I heard crying and what sounding like a cat in the litter box. I didn't want to risk anything so off to the vet Jack went--I checked the box, I know Jacks pee (as crazy as that sounds) and it all looked normal. The vet felt his bladder there was no sensitivity so we just did antibiotics--I honestly didn't think he had a UTI, I just wasnt' risking anything. The vet said oh he should really go on science diet. And I said actually he's raw fed. This is a direct quote "I wouldn't recommend that, no vet would recommend that, it's really a fad diet". It took everything I had to not say, "yes cats eating raw meat, a fad, I always see the zookeepers passing out cat chow to the lions." But I refrained and said, "we aren't going go to go the route of science diet thanks."

I am going to speak to the vet who see's my reptiles as he see's cats as well and I think he may be more open to the raw fed idea. He is more expensive and a much further drive, but might be worth it for the annual visits with the boys. Emergency visit things could be maintained at the current vet.

Leslie
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,746 Posts
:lol: Yeah, the millions of years cats have been eating raw meat is a "fad," while the 50 or so years they've been eating crap-in-a-bag is the right way to do it. Wow.

Having worked for vets in the past I have mixed feelings about all this. Human doctors are NOT expected to know every single thing about the one species they treat. Most GPs will readily admit they aren't experts on nutrition or, for that matter, kidney disease or heart disease or mental health. But vets ARE expected, at least by the general public, to be "experts" not only on every single topic (including training/behavior, which is REALLY a joke!) to do w/ animals, but to be an expert on multiple species!

SO on the one hand I feel sorry for vets b/c this is the expectation. But OTOH I get annoyed w/ them b/c most of them just WILL NOT admit they are NOT experts in all these areas.

I don't go to the vet for info on nutrition, behavior, etc. I know far more about both those topics than any vet I've ever worked for as an employee or worked with as a client. I go to the vet for information on various diseases, for diagnostic information, and for procedures (surgery, etc.). That's it.

I think that it's important to understand the limitations of vets, not expect them to know all this stuff, and use them for what they really DO know about. Makes things better for everyone.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top