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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a beautiful almost 1 year old female cat called Ripley. We're thinking of getting another kitten to keep her company once I go back to full time work and won't be at home during the day to play with her and keep her company. I'd also like another cat because well I love cats and I think you can never have too many.

Do people have any advice about whether to get a boy or a girl? Ripley is desexed and fully indoor, as would be the new arrival. Would she get along better with another female? Or a male? I wonder because I know dogs prefer a dog of the other sex (less fights). Any info would be great.

Thanks.
 

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Personalities matter much more than which sex the cat is. Kittens are accepted pretty easily is most cases because they're too small to be threatening. Not to small to be annoying, though, so expect some bops on the head to keep them in line.
 

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Ripley is desexed, as would be the new arrival.
I wonder if desexed is the right term as I think both males and females retain gender behaviour after the big op.

I have no real info, but I wonder if a companion of the opposite sex would be best because possibly it would lead to less jealousy.

When I had Zenobi, I'd let her out for supervised periods. The woman next door had a little grey cat. Now this little grey did not bother either of the two males that came around for a bite to eat, but she tried very hard to run Zenobi off. She was always a very shy cat and wouldn't come close enough to be touched, but she'd do the rolling on the back thing for me at a distance. I took it that she was jealous of Zenobi and could still identify her sex.
 

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Personality/temperament is more important; though I would lean towards a kitten of the opposite sex. Would you get the kitten from a shelter/foster home? If so, spend a good amount of time with the kittens before adopting, ask about their activity level, personality (dominant, laid back, attention hog, etc.) and pick one that matches or is similar to your current cat. Kittens in general are more hyper than adults, but you wouldn't want a 10 Ib full grown cat pestering and wrestling another smaller low-activity cat. I learned that the hard way with Simone & Pumpkin. I have to make time to play with Simone every day or he takes out his pent-up energy on Pumpkin!

Also, if you can't watch them during the transition period, you would probably want a slightly older kitten who can hold their own (like 3 or 4 months old).
 

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Agree that personality and temperament matter more than the sex

you would probably want a slightly older kitten... (like 3 or 4 months old).
3 or 4 months is not older, that's the correct age. Kittens shouldn't leave their mums until at least 12 weeks.
 

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When I chose my Birman kitten, I do wanted a male. One concern is the temperament match and the other is the size (my other cat, Meatball, is of a larger breed, so I was hoping a male Birman can catch up with her size). However, the only kitten in the litter with the color I want is a girl, so I ended up with two girls at home. They don't have any problem getting along, has been good buddy since day 3 of their first meet. And although Metoo is smaller in size, Meatball almost always let her win their play fight :) If you have two intact male cats at home, I would assume there could be a confilct. But two females should be ok, even before spay.
 

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Agree that personality and temperament matter more than the sex



3 or 4 months is not older, that's the correct age. Kittens shouldn't leave their mums until at least 12 weeks.
If you are getting them from a shelter that is older. Shelters around here (we have TONS of strays here in the south) are lucky to keep them together till 6 weeks if they are even brought in together at all. They wouldn't be able to survive if they had to keep the kittens with their moms as long as preferred.

Not sure how it works in Australia, but that is how it is here.
 

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Not sure how it works in Australia, but that is how it is here.
Varies by state, but generally 8-10 weeks is the minimum. In addition there are vaccination and microchipping laws, in the OP's state "all animals must now be microchipped before leaving the establishment (as well as wormed, desexed and vaccinated)"
 

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I agree that personality and temperament are more important than sex. You should try to adopt a kitten or young cat with a similar temperament to Ripley.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you for the responses. The hope would be to pick up a kitten from one of the shelters here in Melbourne (Ripley is a shelter cat too and it's worked out wonderfully).

So basically I'm looking for another cat like Ripley and at the end of the day it doesn't matter if it's a boy or a girl.

Thanks again!
 
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