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Yeah, I read it and enjoyed it. Not enough to read all the sequels or watch any of the movies/tv made from it. But I thought it was a great book, Kurt.
 

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I just finished reading. 'Cat to the Dogs' by Shirley Rousseau Murphy, A Joe Grey Mystery.
What a FUN read! Joe Grey (a cat!) And his female lady friend Dulcie (also a cat!) Help to solve mysteries with their Special Feline skills!
Now I want to read the rest of her Series, with these cats, at the center of her stories! :thumbup::thumbup:
 

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I'm trying to make it through the Twilight series but Amelia steals my attention away from reading quite often. I am also finishing up What Cats Should Eat so I make sure my girl has great nutrition.
 

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I was surprised by The Midnight Show Murders. Al Roker is actually a skilled writer!

Has anyone ever read the Ruby The Rabbi's The Rabbi's Wife mysteries? Which Big Giver stole The Chopped Liver, Don't Cry For Me , Hot Pastrami, Out Of The Frying Pan And Into The Choir?
 

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I like anything written with lots of irony and humor. Anything by 19th-century French author Theophile Gautier. His supernatural tales are so much fun - they range from slightly creepy to totally goofy, like "The Mummy's Foot."

And he was a cat lover. His cat Eponine had her own chair at the table. :)
 

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I cruised to the library yesterday, and checked out the Prince And The Pauper. It's one of those books you just sit and read, and read, and the heck with work. But they pay me to be at the sports arena. Mark Twain was also a cat lover!
 

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I'm trying to make it through the Twilight series but Amelia steals my attention away from reading quite often. I am also finishing up What Cats Should Eat so I make sure my girl has great nutrition.
Gizmo likes to throw himself on top of my iPad when I'm reading or watching something. And it's not like he'll let me continue to read if I move it, so I stop and cuddle with him, and by the time i remember that I was reading something it's bedtime... with this routine, I'll never finish reading a book.
 

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Timothy Zahn has a new series out ,Basil and Moebius. Basil and Moebius are two loveable scoundrels out for some quick cash, who are hired to find rare and magical artifacts. The first entry, Of Biblical Proportions, sounds intriguing, he's one of my favorite sci-fi authors.
 

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Jumping onto the reading thread, choochoo!

I've been (very slowly) reading The Zahir by Paulo Coelho - so far so good, easy read, which is usually what I need :)
 

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I just finished The Legend Of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving. I love that story, perfect fall reading!

The whole tale about the headless horseman, is that something Washington Irving made up for his story?
 

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My librarian/folklorist friend assures me that it was just a funny/scary story written by Washington Irving. upstate NY is rich in folktales and ghost stories. She's visiting her mum there, this week.

Also, Sleepy Hollow is part of Tarrytown.
 

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The story does have some basis in history. The Hudson River Valley in the late 1700s had a lot Hessian soldiers leftover from the Revolutionary War. They were hired by the British to help squash the revolution.

THey were told to be ruthless and incredible sharpshooters and horseman. The area was predominately Dutch and they did not care for the Hessians and often told terrifying stories of their ruthlessness and cruelty. At one point a headless Hessian was found and buried near hte old Dutch Burying ground.

Ichabod Crane did indeed exist. He was a Military Man who served in the War of 1812, Washing Irving met this man @ Fort Pike in Sackett's Harbor, NY in 1814 and was inspired by the name and the man's character (although, obviously he was nothing like the schoolteacher in the story.

The mannerisms, behavior, and job of Irving's character were inspired by a teacher friend of his from Kinderhook NY. He was originally from Connecticut.

THe town of Sleepy Hollow didn't actually exist until 1996, the original town in the book was supposedly fashioned after Kinderhook, NY. North of Tarrytown. In 1996 they 'broke' off a portion of Northern Tarrytown and named it "Sleepy Hollow". I can imagine it was *GREAT* for tourism.
 

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Oh, also there was some buzz back in Irving's day of a Dutch tale about a "Wild Huntsman" who would chase people @ breakneed speeds through the woods, but only those who had committed terrible crimes. It seems like that was more of a old folk tale though, not anything tangible.
 

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OO! Thanks Kriss! Isn't there a yearly festival in the area, celebrating the story? Many Hessians were sympathetic to the colonists and some defected. One of the 1st drill instructors in the U.S. army was German. He would chew the men out, going off in mixed German and English tirades that had the troops howling with laughter.
 
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