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Discussion Starter #1
I've been searching the forums, and may not be looking hard enough, but I can't seem to find a thread about the best dry foods to feed.

I'm trying to get Addison on a mostly wet food diet, but still want to leave dry out for him during the day and in between meals... or so he won't go hungry when he's being picky and won't eat his healthy wet food.

What are some of the good brands out there? I've heard dry foods are bad because of all the carbs, but are there brands that aren't so high carb? What do you all use and are there any resources around to pick a good dry food?

Thanks so much!
 

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All dry foods will have higher carbs than wet food. There are many good brands you can feed, however, because not everyone can (or wishes to) feed an all-wet diet. Many of the wet cat food brands have very good dry products available as well. Here are some brands commonly used by cat forum members: Innova, Wellness, Blue, Chicken Soup, Felidae, Natural Balance, Solid Gold, and California Natural. Just check the food labels to make sure that you are satisfied with the ingredients and the price.
 

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If he has dry food to nibble on all day, he is likely to *not* eat his wet food, not because he's being finicky, but because he isn't hungry.

It is not normal for cats to eat 24 hours a day. He does not need any dry food to nibble on during the day. I have yet to see a cat starve to death within 12 hours of a meal. None of them are particularly good for cats, though some are less bad than others. Even the best brands are still 1/3 carbohydrates or more, which can predispose him to many diet-related health problems.

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The only reason I leave it out is because he tends to eat a few bits at a time of his wet, and I don't like it sitting out a long time. He really barely eats his dry food anyway, so I guess I can just do away with it all together. Its just that if he isn't hungry when I put the wet out, he won't eat it, then it just sits there and I have to throw it away.

Do you think he'd be more likely to eat it if I didn't give him dry at all?
 

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I'm pretty certain he will be more hungry. Putting Addison strictly onto meals will regulate his system so that he is hungry when you *want* him to be. If you leave dry kibble out, even if he only eats a bit, it's like having a handful of potato chips and then sitting down to eat a bland casserole for supper (healthy stuff *never* tastes as good as potato chips :lol: ).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Oh, I meant to ask. I know people say dry food is good for their teeth, then other people say they don't chew enough to do any good. Does feeding all wet really have no bad effects on cats' teeth?

The main reason I worry about his teeth, are that he has bad breath already so I'm sure his teeth could be better, but they aren't yellow or anything. I know I can't try to brush or clean them myself. He HATES his mouth messed with. When the vet was checking his teeth, she could barely hold it open long enough to look.

If there's anything I can feed him to take care of his teeth, that'd be a helpful piece of information because I don't want him to have problems later on.
 

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Studies have shown that dry food does not produce significantly less tartar than wet food. So it doesn't remove tartar, but rather builds it just like any food. Most cats don't chew the kibble, and even if they do, it shatters when the tooth punctures it. Even dental diets like T/D, are in my opinion uneffective, because the kibble does not score the *entire* surface of the tooth but rather the tip (tartar builds up most heavy by the gumline).

I'm not quite sure what you can do in your situation. Your best bet would be to slowly acclimatize Addison to toothbrushing, but I'm not sure that is feasible in your situation. Start slowly by just touching his face, then when he is comfortable with that, touch his lips. After a few days, move forward an insert you finger in by his gums. That way you can slowly work towards brushing. I wish cats gnawed things just like dogs, because then this would be easier :wink: .

If you can't get near his teeth, you may have to just get dental cleanings of his teeth more often. Levi has genetically poor teeth and so despite the daily brushing, still has extractions every year. I find in my situation that I just have to save for the cleanings every year because I have no other choice. I'm not sure if you may be in the same boat as I am. Dr. Jean says that she cleans her cats teeth once a year, but does not brush them. So that is an option, if you can afford it...
 
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