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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I am wondering when you guys have neutered your kittens. The adoption agency told us to do it between 4 and 5 months but the vet recommended 6 months. Our kitten is VERY rambunctious - will neutering calm him down a bit? If so, should we do it earlier than 6 months to prevent any increasing nuttiness?

Thanks
tanyuh
 

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I had a male and female done at 4months though it really did not seem to calm them down at all. One of my other males was not done until 6 months and he did seem to appear to calm down a little but I think it might have had more to do with him coming out of his crazy kitten stage than it had to do with neutering.
 

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Kinda Confusing...

Our Yorkie pup was done at 12 weeks by the breeder. It seems breeders and vets have different opinions about when to get them fixed. Breeders say (the one's we've gotten our purebred toy dogs from) that to get males fixed at about 4 months, or right before they start marking territory; because once that instinct is there to leave their mark, it'll always be. And I can vouch for that because we got our big outside male dogs fixed at 1 year, and they still mark, yet we got our indoor cats and dogs fixed right when they started, and we've never had problems. Now with females, I like to wait after their first heat. We got our female cat fixed at 6 months, right when she started to go into heat because all these tom cats started coming around... If all of this sounds confusing, I'll just lay it out like this:

Breeders say:

females: 3-4 months
males: 3 months or right before they start marking

Vets say:
females: after first heat or 6 months
males: 5 months to 1 year (usually no later than 1 year or it can kind of mess them up)
 

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Tiber was neutered at about 6.5 months and i've never had a problem with him spraying. but he's still a goofy kitten. some of his old habits have dissapeared, (he doesnt feel the need to be so clingy at night all the time with the purring massages... he used to do it at least 4 times a night, now he does it maybe once a week, dont get me wrong i love the love he's giveing me, but eeesh all night long! oh and he doesnt attack my toes in bed as much any more) and he's picked up some new ones. Like now we play tag back and forth down the hall, (we chase each other's feet). But i dont think that had anything to do with neutering, just him growing up.
 

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I've never heard of a vet suggesting to wait till a female has gone into heat. Heat cycles aren't good for a cat in the long run unless they are to breed. Most vets fear the early spay/neuter because they are scared the cat will not grow properly due to lack of hormones plus the risk of the anesthsia. Males and females should be spayed and neutered around 4- 6 months. Thats when most vets feel comfortable. Some may do it as early as 12 weeks. Some say it calms them some say it dosen't. Kittens will be kittens I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Wonderful, thanks for the advice! Okay, Psi will be 5 months at the end of July. I am going out of town in early August until August 25th. (Don't worry, I have a sitter!) Should I get him neutered before I leave or after I get back? I sure hope he grows out of his crazy kitten stage soon! How many days does it usually take for a cat to get well after being neutered? God, it must be painful, I can't even imagine! But, it's the "responsible owner" thing to do. My neighbor keeps taking in strays but never gets them neutered and they are ALL outdoor cats. There are about 7 toms outside and one female! They come into our patio and spray EVERYTHING. I won't be able to STAND it if Psi starts doing it, it's so gross! I think the female is spayed though because she has been around for about two years and has never had kittens. She was abandoned by another neighbor who may have had her spayed when he had her. Some people! I don't let my cats outside at all but I will always have any pet I have spayed/neutered just for their health or incase they ever get out.

Thanks again,
tanyuh
p.s. I'm pretty new to this forum and I must say that I am really liking it! You guys are great!
 

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tanyuh
I'm glad you feel that it is important to spay/neuter. I can't stand when people think it's okay not to spay or neuter. I think it takes a few days until they would be okay to leave him on his own. It's up to you and it depends on the person your letting watch the cat. Be sure it's someone you trust that will be responsible and won't let the cat outside.
 

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Sorry, slightly out of date....

The vets around here, out in the country, are so old fashioned, I probably sound like I don't know what I'm talking about...lol! Alot of the vets here also work primarily on livestock and such, so they don't specialize in cats and dogs much. That's what you can expect living out in the boonies I reckon.
 

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I´m gonna nag about "how we do in Sweden" again :D

In Sweden it is not recommended to spay/neuter a cat before the age of 6 months and when it comes to females it´s recommended she´s gon into heat at least once.

Research has shown that cats that are spayed/neutered to early can get problems with the skeleton. Testosterone and estrogen (correct spelling?) are important hormones when it comes to growth.

I would recomend you to spay/neuter your cat at the age of 6 months, at the earliest. It works for us in Sweden so why shouldn´t it work for you americans :)

My youngest female wasn´t neutered until the age of 14 months.
 

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It is also proven that the more heat cycles the cat has the higher the risk for cancer and Uterine (pyometra) infections. So how can that be benificial? You see? Letting the cat grow to be more stockier isn't really worth the risks involved. Plus when cats go into heat.. some spray and pee everywhere plus the fact that they constantly cry out. Now I can deal with it because I am a breeder. But I highly doubt the average pet owner wants to put up with that kind of behavour. For males once they start spraying say goodbye to a nice clean smelling house. Thats a habit that is hard to kick. I wouldn't wait more than 6 months to fix a cat.
Hello beautiful: I know some vets do say that the female should go into heat first but it's proven now that it is not necessary and the reasons arestated above. I wasn't trying to make it sound like you don't know what your talking about but I'm just sharing my knowledge since I had to do resent studies on the matter. :wink:
 

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Bengalsownme said:
It is also proven that the more heat cycles the cat has the higher the risk for cancer and Uterine (pyometra) infections. So how can that be benificial? You see? Letting the cat grow to be more stockier isn't really worth the risks involved. Plus when cats go into heat.. some spray and pee everywhere plus the fact that they constantly cry out. Now I can deal with it because I am a breeder. But I highly doubt the average pet owner wants to put up with that kind of behavour. For males once they start spraying say goodbye to a nice clean smelling house. Thats a habit that is hard to kick. I wouldn't wait more than 6 months to fix a cat.
Hello beautiful: I know some vets do say that the female should go into heat first but it's proven now that it is not necessary and the reasons arestated above. I wasn't trying to make it sound like you don't know what your talking about but I'm just sharing my knowledge since I had to do resent studies on the matter. :wink:
Of course you shouldn´t keep your cat fertile if it´s not ment for breeding. Few cats get into heat before the age of six months though so I believe six months is the perfect age for spaying/neutering cats. Risking the growth of the skeleton can cause the cat a lot of pain and unnecessary veterinariancare not to mention the economic side of it.

The reason why my youngest cat wasn´t neutered until the age of 14 months was simply because she didn´t go into heat until she was 14 months old.

I still claim that six months is the ideal age for spaying/neutering, but if the cat goes into heat before the age of six months (which is very unusual) you can spay/neuter the cat earlier.
 

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You have your opinion I have mine. I personally would rather have it done earlier than later. As a breeder I would rather place my pet quality kittens already altered at 12 weeks so I know that they will not be producing and the owner won't have to worry about it later.
Here is a study that was done it's pretty interesting.
http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/reports ... euter.html
 

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Bengalsownme said:
You have your opinion I have mine. I personally would rather have it done earlier than later. As a breeder I would rather place my pet quality kittens already altered at 12 weeks so I know that they will not be producing and the owner won't have to worry about it later.
Here is a study that was done it's pretty interesting.
http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/reports ... euter.html
It´s very important to keep as many animals as possible availible for breeding when it comes to my breed, devon rex, since it is a very small breed here in Sweden so we wait as long as possible to neuter them. The only things I would do if one of the kittens showed to be "bad for breeding" is keep the kitten myself until the age of 6 months then neuter it and sell it or sell it and register in the swedish cat association as "not allowed for breeding". The new owner can breed but not register the offspring from that cat.

I rather wait a bit longer to neuter cats than doing it to early, but thats me (and most of the people in Sweden). My personal point of view is that if a person buys a pet, they should be prepared for a little bit of annoyance when the animal goes into heat. Most animals stop with their annoying habits such as marking territory after they´ve been neutered.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
For me, I want to make sure my male kitty doesn't spray even once before I get him neutered because that may make it harder for him to stop. I knew a male cat that was neutered too late and was VERY violent when he played and would "hump" your arm or your leg. I *really* don't want a cat like that! I think we may do it at the end of July which would make him just about 5 months. From that study that was linked above, it said there was virtually no difference between getting a kitty neutered at 7 weeks vs. 7 months so I hope 5 months will be adequate.

On a side note:
Bengals, since you are a breeder, I assume you get kittens spayed/neutered quite often. How much do you usually pay for it?

tanyuh
 

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"Increased long bone length was observed in both males and females in Groups 1 and 2. This appeared to be due to the fact that physeal closing (closure of the bone growth plate) was delayed in Groups 1 & 2. This explains why cats neutered and spayed as kittens are frequently larger (longer and taller) than unaltered cats or cats altered later in life. This seems to be particularly true for males." (From the link given by bengalsownme.)

This what I´m talking about. It does not only make tha animals bigger but it can also cause weak skeleton.
 

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Tanyuh, It totally depends on the vet. My vet is about $100 for spay and less for neutering a male. I actually don't get them neutered... The purchaser will have to do that. But it's generally around that range. The humane society is the cheapest by me. Private practices are of course more expensive and they vary. Shop around and find the best one that you are comfortable. The vet at the humane society by me is such a great Doc. I really like her. Very caring person and I know several people that bring their fuzzy babies there. :) Ask around. But plan on around $100 and make sure you get pain pill for him and antibiotic to prevent infection. It is a painful procedure but as you can see in the research that was done they recover faster when they are young with less complications.
 

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Sol said:
"Increased long bone length was observed in both males and females in Groups 1 and 2. This appeared to be due to the fact that physeal closing (closure of the bone growth plate) was delayed in Groups 1 & 2. This explains why cats neutered and spayed as kittens are frequently larger (longer and taller) than unaltered cats or cats altered later in life. This seems to be particularly true for males." (From the link given by bengalsownme.)

This what I´m talking about. It does not only make tha animals bigger but it can also cause weak skeleton.
They made no mention of the structure being weakened they just are larger. Some humans are larger than others and that doesn't mean they are weaker? They are usually stronger actually. It says the bone growth plate was delayed but it was complete. They simply have more bone mass than unaltered cats. Make sense? This study proved that altering your cat at an earlier age was beneficial to the cat not that there are more complications. In fact they show that waiting is not as good because the cat will grow to be unaffectionate and more aggressive.

Sol your a new breeder you know what your dealing with when you have a unaltered animal. The general population really doesn't want to have to clean up cat urine everywhere and have a cat that has a major attitude and cries when they are heat. They want a loveable cuddly companion. My friends that are breeders say even when they neuter and retire one of their breeding males the cat still acts the same and some do continue to spray. I feel it's just not worth the wait. I recommend spaying or neutering at least by 6 months.
 

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I have no reports to refer to one of Swedens most skillful vets has written a book about cats and their diseases where she in on chapter concentrates on early neutering and it´s consequences. The bone growth plate doesn´t always close and this causes weak bones. Early neutered cats also tend to grow faster than others which can cause pain.

I don´t know how americans are but swedish ordinary people keep their animals unaltered until the age of 6-7 months simply because few swedish vets neuter cats before the age of 6 months. Few people get problems with their cats, though because of the simple fact that very few cats goes into heat before the age of 8-9 months.
 

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yeah 6-7 months is about normal here too but you were mentioning waiting longer until they have a heat cycle.
I think 6 months is definately appropriate its just that you were saying that you wait to the cats go into heat when that is not neccessary. It is proven that they do not need to go into heat before they are neutered. It makes no difference except the fact you are increasing the risk of breast cancer and uterine cancer and possible infection. Whats the point of that?
 

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yeah 6-7 months is about normal here too but you were mentioning waiting longer until they have a heat cycle.
I think 6 months is definately appropriate its just that you were saying that you wait to the cats go into heat when that is not neccessary. It is proven that they do not need to go into heat before they are neutered. It makes no difference except the fact you are increasing the risk of breast cancer and uterine cancer and possible infection. Whats the point of that?
Most people here wait until the cat goes into heat just because that´s when they notice that it´s time for neutering, this mostly goes for females though. Males are somehow automatically neutered at the age of 7 months, probably because everyone knows how bad it smells when they start to mark territory. :)

So, we agree that 6-7 months is a good age?
 
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