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I've never heard of a vet suggesting to wait till a female has gone into heat. Heat cycles aren't good for a cat in the long run unless they are to breed. Most vets fear the early spay/neuter because they are scared the cat will not grow properly due to lack of hormones plus the risk of the anesthsia. Males and females should be spayed and neutered around 4- 6 months. Thats when most vets feel comfortable. Some may do it as early as 12 weeks. Some say it calms them some say it dosen't. Kittens will be kittens I guess.
 

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tanyuh
I'm glad you feel that it is important to spay/neuter. I can't stand when people think it's okay not to spay or neuter. I think it takes a few days until they would be okay to leave him on his own. It's up to you and it depends on the person your letting watch the cat. Be sure it's someone you trust that will be responsible and won't let the cat outside.
 

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It is also proven that the more heat cycles the cat has the higher the risk for cancer and Uterine (pyometra) infections. So how can that be benificial? You see? Letting the cat grow to be more stockier isn't really worth the risks involved. Plus when cats go into heat.. some spray and pee everywhere plus the fact that they constantly cry out. Now I can deal with it because I am a breeder. But I highly doubt the average pet owner wants to put up with that kind of behavour. For males once they start spraying say goodbye to a nice clean smelling house. Thats a habit that is hard to kick. I wouldn't wait more than 6 months to fix a cat.
Hello beautiful: I know some vets do say that the female should go into heat first but it's proven now that it is not necessary and the reasons arestated above. I wasn't trying to make it sound like you don't know what your talking about but I'm just sharing my knowledge since I had to do resent studies on the matter. :wink:
 

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You have your opinion I have mine. I personally would rather have it done earlier than later. As a breeder I would rather place my pet quality kittens already altered at 12 weeks so I know that they will not be producing and the owner won't have to worry about it later.
Here is a study that was done it's pretty interesting.
http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/reports ... euter.html
 

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Tanyuh, It totally depends on the vet. My vet is about $100 for spay and less for neutering a male. I actually don't get them neutered... The purchaser will have to do that. But it's generally around that range. The humane society is the cheapest by me. Private practices are of course more expensive and they vary. Shop around and find the best one that you are comfortable. The vet at the humane society by me is such a great Doc. I really like her. Very caring person and I know several people that bring their fuzzy babies there. :) Ask around. But plan on around $100 and make sure you get pain pill for him and antibiotic to prevent infection. It is a painful procedure but as you can see in the research that was done they recover faster when they are young with less complications.
 

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Sol said:
"Increased long bone length was observed in both males and females in Groups 1 and 2. This appeared to be due to the fact that physeal closing (closure of the bone growth plate) was delayed in Groups 1 & 2. This explains why cats neutered and spayed as kittens are frequently larger (longer and taller) than unaltered cats or cats altered later in life. This seems to be particularly true for males." (From the link given by bengalsownme.)

This what I´m talking about. It does not only make tha animals bigger but it can also cause weak skeleton.
They made no mention of the structure being weakened they just are larger. Some humans are larger than others and that doesn't mean they are weaker? They are usually stronger actually. It says the bone growth plate was delayed but it was complete. They simply have more bone mass than unaltered cats. Make sense? This study proved that altering your cat at an earlier age was beneficial to the cat not that there are more complications. In fact they show that waiting is not as good because the cat will grow to be unaffectionate and more aggressive.

Sol your a new breeder you know what your dealing with when you have a unaltered animal. The general population really doesn't want to have to clean up cat urine everywhere and have a cat that has a major attitude and cries when they are heat. They want a loveable cuddly companion. My friends that are breeders say even when they neuter and retire one of their breeding males the cat still acts the same and some do continue to spray. I feel it's just not worth the wait. I recommend spaying or neutering at least by 6 months.
 

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yeah 6-7 months is about normal here too but you were mentioning waiting longer until they have a heat cycle.
I think 6 months is definately appropriate its just that you were saying that you wait to the cats go into heat when that is not neccessary. It is proven that they do not need to go into heat before they are neutered. It makes no difference except the fact you are increasing the risk of breast cancer and uterine cancer and possible infection. Whats the point of that?
 
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