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Discussion Starter #1
Our kitten turned four months old at the beginning of September. The vet told us to wait until 6 months to spay her, and I read a number of articles advocating spaying as early as 8 weeks. I'm confused. She is 4.25 lbs and right on target weight-wise I think. When do you recommend I spay her? She is indoor only, and the only cat.

ETA: I should add that my main concern is altering her growth curve, but I also don't want to wait until possible spraying begins.

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Vets generally say 6 months but I know some vets who will spay at 2lbs and 2 months.

You should be able to spay now without any concern assuming you can find a vet who will do it.
 

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Miley was spayed at 4 months but that may have been because she had a brother in the same household and the vet wouldn't neuter him until he hit 6 months. I got them at 5 months, Miley weighed 6 lbs and Ollie was 7.5. So she was a good size by then and I'm sure they wanted to get her before she went into heat.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you both for responding! I found a vet that will do it when she is five months old. That's sometime in October. What if first heat happens before then? She is an only pet, I would think there is less of a chance of her spraying if it happens, right?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok, thanks. Sorry for all these questions, I think I may be overly concerned. New cat parent here :)


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I think early spaying is preferable, since the recovery time is so much shorter. Muffs was spayed at 10 weeks. She had the surgery in the morning, and she was running and playing in the afternoon, as if nothing ever happened. Abby was spayed a bit later (4.5 months), because she needed to weigh 2 lbs, and she didn't hit 2 lbs until she was 4 months old. Her recovery took about a day. I never encountered any weight issues from spaying the girls early. Muffs is now 9.5 lbs and Abby is 9 lbs.
 

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I think early spaying is preferable, since the recovery time is so much shorter. Muffs was spayed at 10 weeks. She had the surgery in the morning, and she was running and playing in the afternoon, as if nothing ever happened. Abby was spayed a bit later (4.5 months), because she needed to weigh 2 lbs, and she didn't hit 2 lbs until she was 4 months old. Her recovery took about a day. I never encountered any weight issues from spaying the girls early. Muffs is now 9.5 lbs and Abby is 9 lbs.
I wonder if spaying early helps prevent the need for a tummytuck.
 

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My twinz were spayed at just under 10 weeks old (had to wait until Cali met the 2 lb. requirement, she was the runt). They were running around like monkeys that same evening.
 

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I have always been advised to spay/neuter as early as possible by shelters and rescues. When I found a kitten last year (8 weeks old), my vet told me I could spay on the next visit, which I think was 12 weeks. The rescue I work with does it as early as 8 weeks sometimes....they are speutered before they go to their home.
 

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Glad to hear the recovery time is so minimal! I can't help but be nervous about the procedure... Words of encouragement would be a welcome!
 

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Waiting until 6 months is very old fashioned, I prefer vets who are up on the current procedures.

I get my litters done at 10 weeks, before they go to their new homes at 12 weeks.
 

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Could be old fashioned but Ragdolls do mature and grow slower then other breeds. She is now recovering at home. Sleeping since we got back!
 

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Mine was done by the shelter at 8 weeks and almost exactly 2lbs. I can't speak for his recovery as he wasn't mine then, but I can tell you there have been no residual ill effects.

Some cats can mature earlier than 6 months so I'd recommend doing it as soon as you're comfortable and have the cash. A friend of mine put it off now his cat is like 8 moths old and seems to be perpetually in heat.
 

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Could be old fashioned but Ragdolls do mature and grow slower then other breeds. She is now recovering at home. Sleeping since we got back!
Sleeping is to be expected. Within a couple days, your kitty will be back to normal. If you have pain medication, I wouldn't use it unless she appears to be uncomfortable. They tend to start being active when they shouldn't when drugged.
 

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Yah, other then the pain meds they gave her at the vets she doesn't have any additional meds to take... She is taking it easy and already learned the hard way she can't jump as high as usual. She is now content on the floor beside me :)
 

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Could be old fashioned but Ragdolls do mature and grow slower then other breeds. She is now recovering at home. Sleeping since we got back!
Glad she's recovering well, all the Ragdoll (and Maine ****, NFC..etc) breeders I know early neuter, the kittens still grow and mature just fine as studies show.
 

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Interesting to know :)
Must be a Canadian thing! hehehe Anyway, she did not have her first heat before we got her spay, the surgery went well and she is sound asleep! It will be intresting to see how she is doing tomorrow after the meds have worn off.
 

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It is a bit of a Canadian thing. Here the vast majority of vets won't do a female under 6 months. They aren't trained to do it, so I would rather wait until they're comfortable.

Spottycats I agree that there ARE vets who neuter younger, but I don't think that means they are always up to date on the newest/best things.

The only (and I do mean ONLY) animals that are done early are the ones in the rescues. Our Humane Society horded their early s/n vets until just this year when they opened up a low cost s/n system. The catch is that in order to have access you have to prove low income. Basically it's a great idea, and I'm not knocking it, but if you aren't low income and you don't adopt from them or from another rescue then you're still going to have to wait until 6 months for a female and 5 for a male.

I remember having this discussion when my boys were young, as I couldn't get them in until they were 5 months. Things haven't changed that much here, and TBH I'm not too worried about it.

Torri was spayed at 1 years (no males in the house at the time, I was saving up but emergency vet bills ate my savings a few times before I could get enough to have her spayed), she didn't go into heat until 7 months.

I think most females don't go into heat until over 6 months, hence why vets used to spay at 6 months. Young enough that they were still very unlikely to be pregnant, but old enough to safely perform the surgery.
 
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