Cat Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Took my cat to the vet because she was eating so much and NOT gaining weight.
She came up with slightly high thyroid levels but that's not why i'm writing here.
The vet was really impressed with the beauty of her teeth (she's 10) and the glossiness of her coat.

When she heard that I feed my cats whole chicken plus extra liver and hearts, she had a fit.

She asked why I gave them this stuff - she doesn't like to hear they are eating it.

I explained that there is Taurine in those foods. She explained that they can get taurine from
DRY CAT FOOD!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,437 Posts
Its really quite sad how little most vets know about animal nutrition. At our Local vet school, Texas A&M, vet students take ONE three hour course on ANIMAL nutrition...thats all animals, not just cats and dogs. AND that class and many vet schools are sponsored by pet food companies like Hills (that make science diet, and many rx diets). So of course, they are under informed and biased towards these foods. I think your cats obvious good health speaks for itself.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
119 Posts
Hey my vet done that, I would've asked them what cats ate before dry food was invented...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,059 Posts
Well, your vet isn't wrong. Dry cat foods are supplemented with taurine. But taurine isn't the primary issue in feeding a raw diet; moisture is. Cats get most of their water from their food, not from drinking water. So cats who eat dry kibble tend to be chronically dehydrated, which can have devastating effects on the body over time. A raw diet most closely replicates a cat's natural diet, so it much better meets the physiological needs of the feline body.

If your vet is uneasy about feeding a raw diet, she should, at the very least, be recommending a high quality canned cat food to her clients. It is, IMO, irresponsible for a vet to recommend a kibble diet for any companion animal.

Laurie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Laurie, be assured that my vet is not going to convince me that dry cat food is good for my cats. After my oldest
cat dies, there probably will not be any more dry cat food in my house ever again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
The most intelligent person I've ever met, a veterinarian that I shadow on weekends, always recommends dry food. He knows everything about animals there is to know yet he still goes with dry food. His defense is that they improve dental health. He is so smart that sometimes I question myself but it seems so illogical to feed dry food. I don't know his stance on raw food but most vets are against raw feeding because since dogs/cats became domesticated and started eating man-made pet food then that's when their lifespan started increasing tremendously. However, I always say that maybe it's because animals have been getting veterinary care more (i.e. being dewormed and stuff) and are also starting to be kept indoors. Also, vets are against it because there is no empirical evidence or actual studies/research and they can't just recommend/support something when there's no proof. It's best to not even mention it in front of them. I'm glad I finally found a vet who supports raw though.

It always amazes me. Vets are suppose to be very knowledgeable when it comes to animals. If dry food really is bad for them then why don't they know this yet? If they really are that smart (and they are, vet school is actually harder than med. school) then they should most definitely be able to figure it out. A few nutrition sessions and endorsements from pet food companies is not enough to blind them from the truth. By the way, I always hear people saying on the internet that vets get less education on nutrition. The vets I've spoken to always say that they've studied nutrition intensely and it's not just a few classes. Idk though...maybe they're lying :?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,746 Posts
Here's some info on why your vet really shouldn't be your go-to guy on pet nutrition. ;)

http://rawfed.com/myths/vets.html

If your cat is hyperthyroid, hopefully she is on medication for that? You should also consider I-131 treatment, which is essentially a true cure. Ask about this on the main health forum for lots of info!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,677 Posts
catlady2010 said:
If they really are that smart (and they are, vet school is actually harder than med. school) .....

A few nutrition sessions and endorsements from pet food companies is not enough to blind them from the truth. By the way, I always hear people saying on the internet that vets get less education on nutrition. The vets I've spoken to always say that they've studied nutrition intensely and it's not just a few classes.
I don't think Vets stop learning after attending a nutrition class. They're bright people who've dedicated their lives to animals. Maybe a horse vet wouldn't know much about cat nutrition but you probably shouldn't use a orse vet for your cat.

My Vet prefers wet food. She's a Cat Vet Goddess who also rescues cats.

Leave Vets Alone!

 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,746 Posts
<sigh> No one is picking on vets. MOST vets pretty much coast on what they learned in vet school courtesy of Hills. That's just a fact. A few have an interest in nutrition and try to learn more, but most of what is out there in the vet world is, again, courtesy of some major multinational pet food manufacturer or other. They have to go pretty far afield to learn about raw, and most do not. Those who do often get stuck on these massively supplemented ground diets, which are better than dry food for sure, but not really true raw IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
Vets always tell me they get a lot of education on nutrition but what else can they say? I think all vets are great (some of the coolest vets I know recommend dry food unfortunately). That's what's confusing me. If they have dedicated their lives toward animals (and they have obviously) then why don't they know? Dedicating your life means doing research and reading stuff beyond what's forced upon you by pet companies. I don't even think it's ethical for vet schools to accept bribes from pet companies :? Pet nutrition is serious stuff.

Instead of promoting dry food because it prevents dental problems, why don't they promote good quality wet foods and recommend people to brush their animals' teeth periodically?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,746 Posts
They aren't being bribed, per se. They have been educated by Hills in vet school--Hills endows chairs in nutrition at many vet schools around the world, the main nutritional textbook used in vet schools was written by a Hills exec, etc. Since this is what they learned in vet school, it's what they trust. That's understandable to a point.

Most MDs know next to noting about human nutrition either, actually. ;) Just a fact of life!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top