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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I have just started volunteering at a rescue cattery in the hope of getting paid employment in October, cat's are my passion & I love this job but I am very concerned about my cat's at home!!!

I have tried to research on line about the likely hood of my bringing home disease/infection but cannot find any information other than that FIP can be carried on my clothing from litter dust _ this worries the bejeebers out of me

I wear gloves when cleaning the trays at the cattery & as soon as I get home I take off my clothes, put them in the washing machine & wash my hands again before touching my babies

I decided last year not to have my kitty's vaccinated annually after researching & deciding that actually as they are indoor only they do not need annual vaccines but now I am working with rescue cat's should I have my kitty's vaccinated annually again??

this is another worry as I done a lot of research into vaccines & realise that over vaccinating is bad for them

so as much as I love working with the rescue cat's am I putting my babies at risk???

I really do not want to do anything that will jeopardise the health of my kitty's

I am going to phone my vet today to ask his advise but I wanted to ask here as I know some of the member's work at rescue centres & keep their own cat's at home

thank you in advance x
 

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I don't believe that FIP is a big threat to your healthy cats at home. It is more likely to be spread to cats that are very young or have comprimised immune systems. I think that if you change your clothes and wash before touching your cats the chance that you will bring anything dangerous home is pretty slim.
 

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If possible, you should take off your shoes and clothes outside or in your garage BEFORE you enter your home. Also, keep some hand disinfectant wipes or gel in your purse to clean your hands before entering your home. Buy a cheap outfit (shoes and maybe overalls, socks, underwear, etc.) that you designate as your shelter uniform, and wear only those items whenever you volunteer. Keep those items in your garage or in a closed garbage bag in your home. If you take those precautions, you will avoid exposing your cats to any airborne pathogens that may attach themselves to your shoes or clothing.

Laurie
 

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Ive volunteered at shelters for years. Then with friends we formed our own rescue/ TNR group. We foster at our homes. I get a lot of the very sick cats. Never once have my own cat contracted anything from the sick cats coming in. None of my friends have either. If you have a senior cat with a compromised immune system Id be careful and do as Laurief suggested. Otherwise I really wouldnt worry.
 

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I would agree with laurief and shan841 - the precautions suggested are the universal ones for people working in all kinds of hazardous or contagious situations - at the zoo, for example, when protecting exotic or rare animals, or in medical situations when dealing with epidemics. And immune-compromised kitties will be the ones most at-risk, if you have any.

You could also consider boosting the health of your home kitties :) by focusing on great diets, minimal use of chemicals such as flea treatments, etc.

I think you are on the right track, and good luck with the job, it sounds wonderful...

Fran
 

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I use to work in a shelter and worked in quarantined environments with cats who had ringworm and other contageous things. I never brought anything home tiny cats. Just make sure you are well protected and when you get home don't touch anything and go right to the ahower
 

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I volunteer for a cat sanctuary that has over 100 cats. The cats that tested positive for FELK and FIV are kept segregated from the general population in their own rooms. Volunteers who clean the room disinfect their hands with hospital-grade disinfectant solution before leaving the room. The sanctuary also has industrial-grade air purifiers. I also use to take care of a feral/stray/abandoned cat colony (now only visit the colony on the weekends).
My resident cat, Ritz, has never caught anything from the cats I come into contact with. I am not concerned about transmission of various viruses; most don't live very long outside the host in any case.
That said, I do vaccinate Ritz against FVRCP, partly because of my work with cats and partly because the company I have pet insurance with requires that vaccination (in addition to rabies). And if I have stepped on a lot of urine/feces (scooping poop/pee), then I may wash my shoes.
 

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I volunteer at a cat sanctuary that has around 700 cats... largest in North America. At the sanctuary I work in the FIV/FeLV room, with around 20+ cats. Most of them have FeLV (leukemia), not FIV (AIDS)... but anyway. When I go, unless it's really hot, I wear long sleeves and always wear jeans. Never clothing I care about. I have two pair of shoes - one pair for summer and one for winter - that I wear there and only there, so I'm not tracking anything around the house accidentally on other days. I wash my hands several times while I'm there with both soap and water as well as with hand sanitizer. I also wash my hands well before I leave.

I take my shoes off as soon as I get home and put them in a closet and I immediately have a shower - I don't touch my pets until I've showered - throwing the clothes I wore down the laundry shoot. I also do not reuse facecloths or towels, they get washed right after I shower as well.

I've had ringworm once (a fungus) that was really bad since I wasn't on top of it, I thought it might be ringworm but no one believed me until it started looking like some hideous livid mark on my body. I've possibly had it since then, but I treated it right away so I'm not sure if it was ringworm or not... but I took precautions like it was before it got bad. No pets or people in this house have had ringworm from me with these precautions (two dogs, two cats, a few people, nor any of my friends or their pets). That's the main thing I'd worry about getting, though. Things like FIP are usually only from kittens and only spread to kittens, and if you take precautions FIV/FeLV are not going to be worrisome either. I've never heard of pets at home getting it.

I wouldn't worry about vaccinating your pets yearly, either. As far as I've heard, it's a total racket.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thank you very much for all your comment's, I spoke to the vet yesterday who basically advised the same so my mid is more at ease now

I have ordered some veterinary hand wash & sanitising gel

I have an old pair of trainer's which I will wear & leave at the cattery & also old clothes that I will change out of & leave at the cattery, I will take it to the laundrette at the end of each week rather than bringing it home

we don't have a shower but I will have a bath as soon as I get home before I touch anything in door's

I will wear gloves at all time's in the cattery while cleaning & I have decided that it will not be necessary to have my cat's vaccinated yearly if I take these precautions

thank you again :)
 
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