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Discussion Starter #1
I'm gonna be putting flowers outside my parents front porch in a little garden this summer.But I don't know what is poisonous to the animals and don't want unnecessary vet trips or dead strays.Any suggestions?Our house is a light pink brick so I'm open to other colors of flowers but I prefer yellow.

Hitomi
 

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As I have ferals and one outdoor cat (not mine, I'm "babysitting", but my dad says I already got too many inside - wasn't too happy when I snuck her in for the winter), I think I should be doing this research too! I have already planned to plant a small patch of catnip at a corner of my garden...kinda hoping that it'll sort of be a "wait stop, this stuff is best, don't bother with the other stuff" barrier. I hope!



ASPCA list - toxic & non-toxic plants = Huge database - detailed search option

Toxic plants = has toxic list, so you'd probably already need to know what you want to find - has links to other sites for toxic plants at the bottom of the page


Double list = list of safe and toxic (safe in green beside toxic listed in red)


Do a web search for "cats toxic plants" or something like that, and I'm sure you can find many more resources. I would double (triple) check on some plants. A couple sites have Columbine listed as safe, but it's not anywhere on ASPCA's site, and that's the one plant I really want... so I gotta find out more about it!

Good luck with your garden!
 

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Gardening is one of my passions! In addition to being non-toxic to cats, you also have to consider other aspects before deciding what to plant. In particular, does the area you will be planting get a lot of sun or is it in the shade most of the day. In addition, are you looking for annuals or perennials. As you might already know, annuals only last for one season and need to be re-planted each year. They're also much smaller, although they bloom for the entire summer. Perennials are planted once and then return each year, although they have much shorter bloom seasons than annuals. They also tend to be larger.

Although you like yellow, you might want to consider adding other colors to the mix, since an "all-yellow" garden would be a bit boring (so, mix in some white or purple, etc.). Annuals tend to come in virtually any color, whereas perennials are available in only a few colors. Here are a few initial suggestions you might consider, depending on whether you're looking for sun/shade and annuals/perennials. You can get images of each plant on google:

Annuals for sunny areas: Snapdragon, Zinnia, Petunia (each have numerous colors, including yellow).
Perennials for sunny areas: Coneflower (yellow or purple), Roses (numerous colors), Phlox (purple, pink, white), Catmint/Catnip (purple, white)
Annuals for shady areas: Begonia, Coleus (numerous colors for each)
Perennials for shady areas: Yellow Corydalis, Astilbe (pink, purple, red, white)

All of the above are safe for cats...not sure about dogs, so you should check that out (although usually if a plant is safe for cats, it's also safe for dogs).

Vivid Dawn: Columbines are safe for cats. They require partial sun.
 

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I also wanted Morning Glory... but I can't.
* Bad for cats
* My dad would get mad at me for planting "weeds" that take over everything (unless I was good at keeping them pruned)

I think purple would go great with yellow. You could have mostly yellow with a few little spurts of purple ever so often!
I've heard that yellow attracts butterflies. Red attracts hummingbirds... if your cats have access to view the garden (low window, glass patio door), it could offer them some entertainment!
 

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Susan - My Mom was an avid gardener herself, and growing up we had just about every plant you mentioned in various gardens around the house. We kept dogs, so we had to make sure they were pet-friendly, so all those you mentioned should be ok for dogs too (unless my Mom made a mistake somewhere, hehe).

Vivid Dawn - Yes, butterflies and hummingbirds are a great way to entertain your pet! My dog growing up, used to sit in front of the big bay window and watch all the little fluttering things in the front garden.

I'm going to throw in Cosmos (the cutest little flower!), Shasta Daisies, and African Violets (non-toxic to cats for sure, and even though they are a little weedy, the purple is unmatched and they make good groundcover). And yes, Columbines are totally safe for pets...people too (don't ask how I know that...lol).
 

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Do cats even eat flowers. Peggy sniffs them occasionally, but never eats them. There's probably all sorts of lethal things in our garden.
 

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Time Bandit: You Mom and I would get along very well! I love my garden, which contains perennials galore. Unfortunately, it was planted before I adopted the girls, so many of my plants are toxic to cats...another reason I only allow them outside in their enclosure.

Hugh: I imagine it depends on the cat. I don't know if the girls would eat my outdoor plants, since I don't give them the opportunity. I have caught them munching on house plants before, so even though the house plants aren't toxic, I keep them out of reach (for the sake of the plant).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
We have rose bushes already but not sure of the colors since my parents just moved here before I moved in.I do like the snapdragons,Zinnias,petunias,cat nip,African voilets,and Shasta Daisies.My favorite is the Columbines by far!Our yard is sunny from 11:00 am to dusk about how much sun do African voilets,Shasta Daisies,and Columbines need?
@Hugh it's not just for my pets the neighborhood has cats that wander all over the place and I rather them be safe too.
 

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Sun from 11 to dusk would qualify as "full sun". Shasta Daisies require full sun, so you'd be fine with them. Columbines do well in either full sun or partial sun. So, they would work too. If one area of the garden is a bit shadier than another, then I would plant the Columbines in the somewhat shady area and the Shasta Daisies in the really sunny part. If all of the garden is equally sunny, then plant them where you want. They'll both do fine.

African Violets rarely survive in gardens...they are primarily houseplants. They prefer to be watered from below (i.e., by putting the water in a saucer on which the plant pot sits). When outdoors, they tend to die either from rain (since they're being "watered" from above, not below) or bugs. So, you might want to put some African Violets in your front window, but I'd keep them out of your garden.
 

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African Violets rarely survive in gardens...they are primarily houseplants. They prefer to be watered from below (i.e., by putting the water in a saucer on which the plant pot sits). When outdoors, they tend to die either from rain (since they're being "watered" from above, not below) or bugs. So, you might want to put some African Violets in your front window, but I'd keep them out of your garden.
Yeah, now that you mention it, violets are a bit of a pain. :? I forgot what my Mom had to go through to plant those and keep them. My Mom always put them in low lying planters, around the sides of the house where the gutters and roof overhangs were a lot bigger. That way rain didn't get at them too much, and they were protected by the house and bigger plants around them. The violets grew around the planters making it so you really couldn't see them.
 

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Yeah, now that you mention it, violets are a bit of a pain. :? I forgot what my Mom had to go through to plant those and keep them. My Mom always put them in low lying planters, around the sides of the house where the gutters and roof overhangs were a lot bigger. That way rain didn't get at them too much, and they were protected by the house and bigger plants around them. The violets grew around the planters making it so you really couldn't see them.
I tried once to grow African violets outside and quickly gave up. When cold water (i.e., rain) hits them from above, they go into "shock". Of course, North Carolina rain is likely warmer than Ontario rain, so you might have a little bit more luck! :)
 
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