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Discussion Starter #1
There's a few things you can do to help that. My answer is always the same: cheat

Practice closing the door. Toss kibble in, and as soon as he's in close the door, just holding it closed without latching. He'll Hoover the treats down, and as soon as he turns around - before he can start getting upset - open the door.

Do that a bunch of times, until he's clearly less stressed when he sees the door closed. Like...5 times a day for a week. During different times of the day.

Get something super yummy like tuna or something else a little mushy. I'd use cheez whiz, or peanut butter just a teeny bit! Wipe it on the floor of the kennel, and repeat the process from above. It'll take him longer to eat the goodies, so he'll be in there longer without fussing.

Do THAT for a while. Part if what you're doing is removing the negative memories of being in the kennel and stressed for a long time, so do it lots over a span of time.

After another week you would start lengthening the time the door is shut with him aware of it. If he's still pretty upset you can either push more goodies through the bars, or go back to the previous step for a while.

When he's not as upset about seeing the door closed that's when you start adding time. Get him in the kennel with treats, as usual, then when he turns around wait 1-2 seconds and open the door. Do that 5-10 times a day for at least a week, then increase the length of time each week.

Once you get to 10 seconds with no fussing (if he gets upset go back a step for another week) you need to mix it up a bit; how long you hold the door shut should be random. One time hold the door for 1 second, the next time maybe its 7 seconds, then 3, then 10, then 2, then 8, ect. You never want him to think he knows how long the door will be shut, or he'll get upset as the time gets longer because who wants to be in a tony box for a minute or more. If he's never sure when the door will open he'll be more accepting.

Always praise him when he comes out of the box, but don't make it a huge deal or he'll fuss to get out for playtime.
I really have Librarychick to thank for all the tips. I did it in less than 2 weeks. I didn't have butter or peanut butter, but I used a new treat. I reserved greenies for grooming sessions.

The 1st time I had the door locked for just 1secs, he wasn't happy and refused to get into the carrier the next time. Instead, he went on top and behind the carrier looking for ways to get the treats which I threw in. Anyway, I still managed to get him to go back in. After a couple tries, lengthening the time the door was locked, he finally made it for nearly 2mins staying locked inside w/o a single fuss. But... I used upto 7 treats in all. I break one treat into 3, its a soft chew, and fed him through the hole at the top of the carrier. He seemed to enjoy getting his treats that way. He didn't wanna come out even after I unlocked the door but still closed, still waiting for his treats, but I really didn't wanna give him too much treats and kept repeating "no more", he finally pushed the door to get out.
 

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That's fantastic!!!

To keep it up just leave his kennel out with the door open and a few times a week hide a treat or two in there when he's not looking.

All 4 of mine have no problems going into kennels and at the vets its a safe place so they feel a bit more secure. Anything to reduce stress is a good thing in my books!
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks Librarychick. I have always left the carrier w/o the door in his room and this is where he sleeps most of the time. He is fine with sleeping in the carrier, but not so fine with being confined in it. I mentioned, during the training, after I closed the door for 1sec, he refused to go inside carrier again the next time? I thought I might have scare him so much, he won't wanna go in to sleep too, but I did take a peek much later to see if he will still sleep in there, oh well, he slept in there alright.

This is so weird, he is not afraid of the carrier, but like you said before, which kitty like to be confined. I will keep doing this training and hope it will at least help to reduce some stress when he finally needs to be confined longer for a trip either to the vet or boarding house. Seriously, I never knew it can be done. 2mins is really something, for him to stay confined w/o a single fuss, I am very very pleased and happy.
 

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Just a little update on ET's carrier training. I continued doing it and we had been getting on very fine and ET loved getting his treats in his carrier. Today, I did something different. We were doing fine until I decided to carry him in the carrier, into my bedroom. The moment he got into my room, he got nervous and started pushing the metal door with his nose. I tried feeding him from the top opening, but he was too nervous to eat. So, we just stayed in my room for just less than 1min and I had to quickly bring him back to his room - HE WAS TERRIBLY STRESSED.

While back in his room, he relaxed and I continued feeding him from the top opening. Maybe I should continue short sessions of a couple seconds in my room every once in a while?
 

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Hi Snowy,
you're on the right track! Just one step at a time! If you've got him used to the door being closed for a couple of minutes now on his carrier, just lift the carrier up for a moment and set it right back down, without carrying it into another room, this will give him time to get used to the lifting movement of his carrier, continue with the treats, when he gets calm with lifting up the carrier, then just take a step or two and set the carrier down again, give him a treat and open the door. Do this a couple times a day and he will learn that the movement of being carried in the carrier, does not mean the end of the world!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Oh thanks! Maybe I went abit too fast. I'll do the lifting thing 1st until he is ready to go to my bedroom, didn't realise I should take this step 1st.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
He is all crazy about the baked chicken treats I made. Each time in the midst of playing Da-bird, he will stop and go to his carrier, waiting for his chicken treat. All went well with his carrier training and I have already taken 2 steps with him in his carrier and its has just progressed thus far. Took 2 more steps this morning (4 steps), he got sooo...nervous and starting poking at the metal door with his nose, trying to get out. SILLY CAT! its not as if I'm gonna send him to the slaughter house.

Anyway, its cute when he got his head out of the top hole.
 

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I love the second photo! It looks as if he is focused on that treat.

My cat and older kitten don't mind the carrier and don't want to leave it when we are at the vets. Nobody uses thermometers or fecal loops in the carrier, no skin scrapings in there either. lol

The young litter will press their heads against, bite, and scratch the metal in a most disturbing way. But it is not safe for them to be free in the house yet at their size. I make a point to have them out for an hour at a time, a few times a day, but they don't like when that is over. If I am not watching, they could get hurt or go in a place where I can't get to them. I have a feeling they will not like carriers when they are older. :(
 
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